yellowstone volcanic history

yellowstone volcanic history - The Quaternary and Pliocene...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Quaternary and Pliocene Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana Robert L. Christenson, USGS PP 729-G Three Volcanic Cycles of Yellowstone • Three extraordinarily large explosive eruptions in the past 2.1 million years each created a giant caldera within or west of Yellowstone National Park with the spread of enormous volumes of hot, fragmented volcanic rocks as pyroclastic flows over vast areas within times as short as a few days or weeks. Three Volcanic Cycles of Yellowstone • The accumulated hot ash, pumice, and other rock fragments welded together from their heat and the weight of overlying material to form extensive sheets of hard lava-like rock • In some sections, these welded ash-flow tuffs are more than 400 m thick! • These ash-flow sheets—from oldest to youngest, the Huckleberry Ridge, Mesa Falls, and Lava Creek Tuffs—account for more than half the material erupted from Yellowstone Three Volcanic Cycles of Yellowstone • The enormous outpouring of magma, 280 to 2,450 km3 during each explosive event, led to the collapse of magma-chamber roofs, causing the ground above to subside by many hundreds of meters to form the calderas. • These ash-flow sheets—from oldest to youngest, the Huckleberry Ridge, Mesa Falls, and Lava Creek Tuffs—account for more than half the material erupted from Yellowstone Three Volcanic Cycles of Yellowstone • The enormous outpouring of magma, 280 to 2,450 km3 during each explosive event, led to the collapse of magma- chamber roofs, causing the ground above to subside by many hundreds of meters to form the calderas. many hundreds of meters to form the calderas....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 07/17/2008 for the course GS 105 taught by Professor Leavell during the Winter '08 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 51

yellowstone volcanic history - The Quaternary and Pliocene...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online