WarnerCorruption

WarnerCorruption - Corruption in Transition Chaz Warner...

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Corruption in Transition Corruption in Transition Chaz Warner Economics 508
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The Basics The Basics Corruption can be categorized into two specific types State Capture- actions of individuals, groups, or firms both in the public and private sectors to influence the formation of laws, regulations, decrees, and other government policies to their own advantage as a result of the illicit and non-transparent provision of private benefits to public officials. Administrative Corruption- the intentional imposition of distortions in the prescribed implementation of existing laws, rules, and regulations to provide advantages to either state or non-state actors as a result of the illicit and non-transparent provision of private gains to public officials.
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Examples Examples State Capture- An influential “oligarch” at the head of a powerful financial-industrial group could buy off legislators to erect barriers of entry in a particular sector. Administrative Corruption- A shop owner forced to pay bribes to official inspectors to overlook minor (or possibly major) infractions of existing regulations.
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Patterns of Corruption Patterns of Corruption High-High - a serious problem of administrative corruption—and hence, weak state capacity—is nested in a state highly subject to capture. High-Medium - countries that have been able to contain the level of administrative corruption relative to other transition countries, but nevertheless have done so in a context of high state capture.
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Patterns of Corruption (cont.) Patterns of Corruption (cont.) Medium-High - the problem of administrative corruption remains the central problem, while the state has been less subject to capture by the private sector than have other transition countries. Medium-Medium
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2008 for the course ECON 508 taught by Professor Fleisher during the Winter '06 term at Ohio State.

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WarnerCorruption - Corruption in Transition Chaz Warner...

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