WesselerRusSS

WesselerRusSS - Russian Social Sector Reforms Scott...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Russian Social Sector Reforms Scott Wesseler Comparative Economic Systems 508 Dr. Belton Fleischer 3-8-05
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction After the fall of the Soviet Union, the newly formed Russian Federation made tough decisions about its priorities and its capacity to carry policy. Russia at least officially made social welfare a top policy priority by constitutionally becoming a social state. It thus spends a large amount of its resources protecting and attempting to develop the welfare of its citizens. The Russian Federation has not to date been completely successful in its attempts. There were improvements made from the old system. However, these improvements by themselves were not able to bring up the standard of living for the majority of Russian citizens as can be shown through poor welfare indicators in the years since the establishment of the new system. The reason why the Russian system of welfare has not been successful can be attributed to flaws in its system and also due to the state of the economy. The Russians have recently taken concrete steps in approving their welfare system but it still needs major reforms. The Soviet System versus the New Russian System The Soviet System: The Soviet welfare system was not a successful welfare system. It enabled various groups (grouped by types of employment, wealth of region, etc.) to obtain a small amount of variation in the quality of welfare aid within a poorly funded and maintained system. Social policy in the latter Soviet years can summed up by describing three consistent characteristics. There was "the pursuit of the gross expansion of 'intermediate' welfare indicators such as the number of doctors and nurses, the number of flats, the number of teachers, and the early retirement age" (Work and Welfare, 36). Social policy was not a priority. It was reduced in its importance and scope by a phenomenon termed the ‘residual principle.’ Under this phenomena the social sector was given only the resources leftover from other highly prioritized areas such as
Background image of page 2
the military industrial complex (Work and Welfare, 36). Finally, the third characteristic of the Soviet system was that it was “a heavily insurance-based system, which was essentially geared to entitlements carefully accumulated as a result of a good employment record. By contrast, the 'social assistance' function, designed to provide income in response to a test of need, was unsystematically developed" (Work and Welfare, 38). These three reoccurring trends had large effects on the social welfare of Soviet Russians. There was a focus on quantity of goods over the quality of these goods. For example the U.S.S.R. had more doctors, nurses and hospital beds per capita than any other major industrial country, however, the quality of the health care provided was very poor (Work and Welfare, 38). There was a lack of capital investment into the social sector, resulting in poor developments in
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/17/2008 for the course ECON 508 taught by Professor Fleisher during the Winter '06 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 16

WesselerRusSS - Russian Social Sector Reforms Scott...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online