46c0465310876z - 9-1 9-5 a b Answers to End-of—Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: 9-1 9-5 a. b. Answers to End-of—Chapter Questions The average investor of a firm traded on the NYSE is not really interested in maintaining his or her proportionate share of ownership and control. If the investor wanted to increase his or her ownership, the investor could simply buy more stock on the open market. Consequently, most investors are not concerned with whether new shares are sold directly (at about market prices) or through rights offerings. However, if a rights offering is being used to effect a stock split, or if it is being used to reduce the underwriting cost of an issue (by substantial underpricing), the preemptive right may well be beneficial to the firm and to its stockholders. The preemptive right is clearly important to the stockholders of closely held (private) firms whose owners are interested in maintaining their relative control positions. No. The correct equation has D1 in the numerator and a minus sign in the denominator. Yes. If a company decides to increase its payout ratio, then the dividend yield component will rise, but the expected long-term capital gains yield will decline. Yes. The value of a share of stock is the PV of its expected future dividends. If the two investors expect the same future dividend stream, and they agree on the stock's riskiness, then they should reach similar conclusions as to the stock's value. A perpetual bond is similar to a no-growth stock and to a share of perpetual preferred stock in the following ways: 1. 2. All three derive their values from a series of cash inflows—coupon payments from the perpetual bond, and dividends from both types of stock. All three are assumed to have indefinite lives with no maturity value (M) for the perpetual bond and no capital gains yield for the stocks. However, there are preferreds that have a stated maturity. In this situation, the preferred would be valued much like a bond with a stated maturity. Both derive their values from a series of cash inflows—coupon payments and a maturity value for the bond and dividends and a stock price for the preferred. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 1 9-1 9-2 9-3 9-4 2 Solutions to End-of-Chapter Problems D0 = $1.50; 91.3 = 7%; 9n = 5%; D1 through D5 = ? = 00(1 + g.) = $1.50(1.07) = $1.6050. 02 = 00(1 + 91x1 + 92) = $1.50(1.07)2 = $1.7174. D3 = 00(1 + 91x1 + 92x1 + 93) = $1.50(1.07)3 = $18376. D4 = 00(1 + 91x1 + 92x1 + 93x1 + 9“) = $1.50(1.07)3(1.05) = $19294. 05 = 00(1 + 91x1 + 92x1 + g3)(1 + gn)2 = $1.50(1.07)3(1.05)2 = $20259. $=0. 50; g: 7%; rs— — 15%;P n = ? D1 = $0.50 rs — g 0.15 — 0.07 130 = 2 $6.25. P0 = $20; D0 : $1.00, 9 = 60/0; [31 = ?; rs = ? F“), = pan + g) = $20(1.06) = $2120- D_1 + g : $1.00(1.06) $20 P 1.06 $$20— + 0.06 = 11.30%. rs = 11-30%- + 0.06 II F. a. The terminal, or horizon, date is the date when the growth rate becomes constant. This occurs at the end of Year 2. I I's_ — 100/0 I l I 1. 25 95 20% 1.50 95: 20% 1. 80 9" 5% 8.9 1.89 37.80 = —— 0.10 — 0.05 The horizon, or terminal, value is the value at the horizon date of all dividends expected thereafter. In this problem it is calculated as follows: $1. 80(1. 05) $37. 80 0. 10— 0. 05 Integrated Case Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation c. The firm's intrinsic value is calculated as the sum of the present value of all dividends during the supernormal growth period plus the present value of the terminal value. Using your financial calculator, enter the following inputs: CFO = 0, CFl = 1.50, CFZ = 1.80 + 37.80 = 39.60, I/YR = 10, and then solve for NPV = $34.09. 9-5 The firm’s free cash flow is expected to grow at a constant rate, hence we can apply a constant growth formula to determine the total value of the firm. Firm value = FCF1/(WACC — g) = $150,000,000/(0.10 — 0.05) = $3,000,000,000. To find the value of an equity claim upon the company (share of stock), we must subtract out the market value of debt and preferred stock. This firm happens to be entirely equity funded, and this step is unnecessary. Hence, to find the value of a share of stock, we divide equity value (or in this case, firm value) by the number of shares outstanding. Equity value per share = Equity value/Shares outstanding = $3,000,000,000/50,000,000 = $60. Each share of common stock is worth $60, according to the corporate valuation model. 9-6 DD = $5.00; vp : $60; rp = ? 9-7 Vp = Dp/rp; therefore, rp = Dp/Vp. a. rp = $8/$60 = 13.33%. b. rp = $8/$80 = 10.0%. c. rp = $8/$100 = 8.0%. d. rp = SSS/$140 = 5.71%. D, _ $10 9-8 a. v, =—— _— =$125. rp 0.08 b. v, = fl = $33.33. 0.12 Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 3 9-9 a. The preferred stock pays $8 annually in dividends. Therefore, its nominal rate of return would be: ‘ Nominal rate of return = $8/$80 = 10%. Or alternatively, you could determine the security’s periodic return and multiply by 4. Periodic rate of return = $2/$80 = 2.5%. Nominal rate of return = 2.5% x 4 = 10%. b. EAR = (1 + mom/4)“ — 1 = (1 + 010/4)“ — 1 = 0.103813 = 10.3813%. _ 00(1 +g) _ $5[1 +(—0.05)] _ $5(0.95) _ $4.75 2 $2375 r _g r5 —g ‘ 0.15—(—0.05) ’ 0.15+0.05 _ 0.20 9-11 First, solve for the current price. it = 01/0. — g) = $0.50/(0.12 — 0.07) = $10.00. If the stock is in a constant growth state, the constant dividend growth rate is also the capital gains yield for the stock and the stock price growth rate. Hence, to find the price of the stock four years from today: F‘. = P00 + 91“ = $10.00(1.07)“ = $13.10796 2 $13.11. 9-12 a. 1 fi=wz$lfl=$950 ' ° 0.15+0.05 0.20 ' ' 2. r30 = $2/0.15 = $13.33. 3. r3 — M— — fl =$21.00. ° ‘ 0.15-0.05 ‘ 0.10 4. F3 — ————$2(1'10) — —$2'20 =$44.00. ° _ 0.15—0.10 _ 0.05 b. 1. 00 = $2.30/0 = Undefined. 2. i3D = $2.40/(—0.05) = —$48, which is nonsense. 4 Integrated Case Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation These results show that the formula does not make sense if the required rate of return is equal to or less than the expected growth rate. c. No, the results of part b show this. It is not reasonable for a firm to grow indefinitely at a rate higher than its required return. Such a stock, in theory, would become so large that it would eventually overtake the whole economy. 9-13 a. n = rm: + (rM — rRF)b,. rc = 7% + (11% — 7%)O.4 = 8.6%. rD : 7% + (11% — 7%)(-o.5) = 5%. Note that r0 is below the risk—free rate. But since this stock is like an insurance policy because it “pays off” when something bad happens (the market falls), the low return is not unreasonable. b. In this situation, the expected rate of return is as follows: PC = DI/Po + g = $1.50/$25 + 4% = 10%. However, the required rate of return is 8.6%. Investors will seek to buy the stock, raising its price to the following: . _ $1.50 _ P‘ ‘ (toss—0.04 ‘ $32'61' . . A $1.50 . . .. . At this pornt, rC : $32 61 + 4% = 8.6% , and the stock Will be in equrllbrlum. 9—14 The problem asks you to determine the value of l33, given the following facts: D1 = $2, b = 0,9, rRF = 5.6%, RPM = 6%, and Pa = $25. Proceed as follows: Step 1: Calculate the required rate of return: rs = W + (M “ I'RF)b = 5.6% + (6%)D.9 = 11%. Step 2: Use the constant growth rate formula to calculate g: F —D—‘+g s — Pg $2 0.11:— $25 +9 9 = 0.03 = 3%. Step 3: Calculate I53: r33 = Pfl(1 + g)3 = $250.03)3 = $273182 z $27.32. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 5 9-15 9-16 6 Alternatively, you could calculate D4 and then use the constant growth rate formula to solve for i331 D4 = 01(1 + g)3 = $2.00(1.03)3 = $2.1855. l53 = $2.1855/(0.11 — 0.03) = $27.3182 z $27.32. a. r5 = rRF + (rM — rRF)b = 6% + (10% — 6%)1.5 = 12.0%. 13; = 01/0. — g) = $2.25/(0.12 — 0.05) = $32.14. A b. r5 = 5% + (9% - 5%)15 = 11.0%. P,J = $2.25/(0.110 — 0.05) = $37.50. A c. rS = 5% + (8% — 5%)1.5 = 9.5%. P0 = $2.25/(0.095 — 0.05) = $50.00. d. New data given: rRF = 5%; rM = 8%; g = 6%, b = 1.3. I’s = rRF + (rM - rRF)b = 5% + (8% — 5%)1.3 = 8.9%. 130 = 01/(r5 — g) = $2.27/(0.089 — 0.06) = $78.28. Calculate the dividend cash flows and place them on a time line. Also, calculate the stock price at the end of the supernormal growth period, and include it, along with the dividend to be paid at t = 5, as CFs. Then, enter the cash flows as shown on the time line into the cash flow register, enter the required rate of return as I/YR = 15, and then find the value of the stock using the NPV calculation. Be sure to enter CFO = 0, or else your answer will be incorrect. D0 = 0; D1 = 0; D2 = 0; 03 = 1.00; D4 = 1.00(1.5) = 1.5; D5 = 1.00(1.5)2 = 2.25; 06 = A 1.00(1.5)2(1.08) = $2.43. P0 = ? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 rs = 15% I l I g; = 50% 9,. = 8% 1.00 1.50 2.25 2.43 0.658 " “(145? +34.714 = i 0.858 X 1/(1.15)4 0.15 — 0.08 5 18.378 #— 36.964 msg = 8. l35 = DB/(rS — g) = $2.43/(0.15 — 0.08) = $34.714. This is the stock price at the end of Year 5. CFO = 0; CF” = O; CF3 = 1.0; CE; = 1.5; CF5 = 36.964; I/YR = 15%. With these cash flows in the CFLO register, press NPV to get the value of the stock today: NPV = $19.89. Integrated Case Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation $40 (1.07) = $42.80 9-17 3. Terminal value = —— = $713.33 million. 0.13 — 0.07 0.06 b. 0 1 2 3 4 WACC = 13% I I I —20 30 40 g" = 7% 42 80 ($ 17.70) 4—L——l"1 1-13 I 23.49 " rig): V... = 713.33 522.10 <%———— 253.33 1152—139 Using a financial calculator, enter the following inputs: CFO = 0; CE = -20; CF2 = 30; CF3 = 753.33; I/YR = 13; and then solve for NPV = $527.89 million. c. Total valuet=o = $527.89 million. Value of common equity 2 $527.89 — $100 = $427.89 million. Price per share = $42789 = $42.79. 9-18 The value of any asset is the present value of all future cash flows expected to be generated from the asset. Hence, if we can find the present value of the‘dividends during the period preceding long-run constant growth and subtract that total from the current stock price, the remaining value would be the present value of the cash flows to be received during the period of long-run constant growth. 01 = $2.00 x (1.25)1 = $2.50 PV(D1) = $2.50/(1.12)1 = $22321 D2 = $2.00 x (1.25)2 = $3.125 PV(D2) = $3.125/(1.12)2 = $24913 D3 = $2.00 x (1.25)3 = $390625 PV(D3) = $3.90625/(1.12)3 = $2.7804 z PV(D1 to D3) = $75038 Therefore, the PV of the remaining dividends is: $588800 — $7.5038 = $513762. Compounding this value fonNard to Year 3, we find that the value of all dividends received during constant growth is $72.18. [$51.3762(1.12)3 = $72.1799 z $72.18.] Applying the constant growth formula, we can solve for the constant growth rate: A P3 = D3(1 + g)/(r5 T 9) $72.18 = $3.90625(1 + g)/(0.12 - g) $8.6616 - $72.189 = $390625 + $3.906259 $4.7554 = $76.086259 0.0625 = 9 6.25% = 9. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 7 9-19 9-20 (I) r5 = 12% 1 2 3 4 = 5°! I I I I D0 = 2.00 9 ° 01 D2 D3 p4 P3 al 01 = $2(1.05) = $2.10; 02 = $2(1.05)2 = $22050; D3 = $2(1.05)3 = $231525. Financial calculator solution: Input 0, 2.10, 2.2050, and 2.31525 into the cash flow register, input I/YR = 12, PV = ? PV = $5.28. Financial calculator solution: Input 0, 0, 0, and 34.73 into the cash flow register, I/YR = 12, PV = ? PV 2 $24.72. $24.72 + $5.28 = $30.00 = Maximum price you should pay for the stock. - :Do(l+g)_ 0, $2.10 p =___= 30.00. ° rs—g rs—g 0.12—0.05$ No. The value of the stock is not dependent upon the holding period. The value calculated in Parts a through d is the value for a 3—year holding period. It is equal to the value calculated in Part e. Any other holding period would produce the same value of Po ; that is, P0 = $30.00. Part 1: Graphical representation of the problem: Supernormai Normal gr OWth growth 0 1 2 3 00 I I —.!.__—'—.A O O I ——| D0 D1 (Dz + P2) D3 Dan on1 ._| PVDZ PVIS2 D1 = 00(1 + gs) = $1.6(1.20) = $1.92. D2 = D0(1 + gs)2 = $1.60(1.20)2 = $2.304. 02: D3 =02(1+g.)=$2.304(1.06) r — 9" r5 — gn 0.10 - 0.06 S = $61.06. 13,, = PV(D1) + PV(D2) + mfg) D1 D2 '32 (1+r5) + (1+rs)2 + (1+ rs): = $1.92/1.10 + $2.304/(1.10)2 + $61.06/(1.10)2 = $54.11. Integrated Case , Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation 9-21 a. Financial calculator solution: Input 0, 1.92, 63.364(2.304 + 61.06) into the cash flow register, input I/YR = 10, PV = ? PV = $54.11. Part 2: Expected dividend yield: DL/Po = $1.92/$54.11 = 3.55%. Capital gains yield: First, find ‘31, which equals the sum of the present values of D2 and IS, discounted for one year. $2.304 + $61.06 .3 Z 1 (1.10)1 = $57.60. Financial calculator solution: Input 0, 63.364(2.304 + 61.06) into the cash flow register, input I/YR = 10, PV 2 ? PV = $57.60. Second, find the capital gains yield: 13, — Po _ $57.60 — $54.11 = 6.45%. P,J $54.11 Dividend yield = 3.55% Capital gains yield : 6.45 10.00%: = r5. Due to the longer period of supernormal growth, the value of the stock will be higher for each year. Although the total return will remain the same, r5 = 10%, the distribution between dividend yield and capital gains yield will differ: The dividend yield will start off lower and the capital gains yield will start off higher for the 5-year supernormal growth condition, relative to the 2-year supernormal growth state. The dividend yield will increase and the capital gains yield will decline over the 5—year period until dividend yield = 4% and capital gains yield 2 6%. Throughout the supernormal growth period, the total yield, r5, will be 10%, but the dividend yield is relatively low during the early years of the supernormal growth period and the capital gains yield is relatively high. As we near the end of the supernormal growth period, the capital gains yield declines and the dividend yield rises. After the supernormal growth period has ended, the capital gains yield will equal 9n = 6%. The total yield must equal rs = 10%, so the dividend yield must equal 10% — 6% = 4%. Some investors need cash dividends (retired people), while others would prefer growth. Also, investors must pay taxes each year on the dividends received during the year, while taxes on the capital gain can be delayed until the gain is actually realized. Currently (2005), dividends to individuals are now taxed at the lower capital gains rate of 15%. 0 1 2 3 4 I WACC = 12% I I I 3,000,000 6,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 Using a financial calculator, enter the following inputs: CFO = 0; CFl = 3000000; CFZ = 6000000; CF3 = 10000000; CE, = 15000000; I/YR = 12; and then solve for NPV 2 $24,112,308. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 9 b. The firm’s terminal value is calculated as follows: $15,000,000(1.07) = 321,000,000. 0.12 — 0.07 $ c. The firm’s total value is calculated as follows: 0 1 2 3 4 S I WACC = 12°/o I I I I I 9.. = 7% 3,000,000 6,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 16,050,000 PV = ? 321,000,000 = W 0.12 — 0.07 Using your financial calculator, enter the following inputs: CFO = 0; CFl = 3000000; CF; = 6000000; CF3 = 10000000; CE, = 15000000 + 321000000 = 336000000; I/YR = 12; and then solve for NPV = $228,113,612. d. To find Barrett’s stock price, you need to first find the value of its equity. The value of Barrett's equity is equal to the value of the total firm less the market value of its debt and preferred stock. Total firm value $228,113,612 Market value, debt + preferred 60,000,000 (given in problem) Market value of equity M Barrett’s price per share is calculated as: $168,113,612 : $16.81. 10,000,000 9-22 FCF = EBlT(1 —T) + Depreciation — Capita' _ AI Net operating J expenditures working capital = $500,000,000 + $100,000,000 — $200,000,000 — $0 = $400,000,000. FCF WACC — g $400,000,000 0.10 — 0.06 _ $400,000,000 _ 0.04 = $10,000,000,000. Firm value This is the total firm value. Now find the market value of its equity. MVTotal = MVEquity + MVDebt $10,000,000,000 = MVEquity + $3,000,000,000 MVEquity = $7,000,000,000. 10 Integrated Case Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation This is the market value of all the equity. Divide by the number of shares to find the price per I share. $7,000,000,000/200,000,000 = $35.00. 9-23 a. Old r5 = rRF + (rM — rRF)b = 6% + (3%)1.2 = 9.6%. New rS = 6% + (3%)0.9 = 8.7%. Old price: f) = 0, :Dn(l+g)_ $20.05) ° r—g rS—g _0.096—0.06 S = $58.89. New price: l3: $2(1'04) —_= 44.26. ° 0.087—0.04 $ Since the new price is lower than the old price, the expansion in consumer products should be rejected. The decrease in risk is not sufficient to offset the decline in profitability and the reduced growth rate. $20.04) b. P = 58.89. P =—. Old $ New r5 —0.04 Solving for rS we have the following: $58.89 = $208 r5 —0.04 $2.08 = $58.89(rs) — $2.3556 $4.4356 = $58.89(r5) rs = 0.07532. Solving for b: 7.532% = 6% + 3%(b) 1.532% = 3%(0) b = 0.5107. Check: rs = 6% + (3%)05107 = 7.532%. ‘3 $2.08 a = ——— = $58.89. 0.07532 — 0.04 Therefore, only if management’s analysis concludes that risk can be lowered to b = 0.5107, should the new policy be put into effect. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 11 9-24 a. End onear: 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 r; = 120/0 95 = 15% I I I 9” = 5% I DD = 1.75 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D: = DD(1 + g)‘. 02006 = $1.75(1.15)1 = $2.01. 02007 = $1.75(1.15)2 = $1.75(1.3225) = $2.31. 02008 = $1.75(1.15)3 = $1.75(1.5209) = $2.66. 02009 = $1.75(1.15)“ = $1.75(1.7490) = $3.06. 02010 = $1.75(1.15)5 : $1.75(2.0114) = $3.52. b. Step 1: 5 D PV fd"d d = t . 0 [VI ens E'UHS)‘ PV D2005 = $2.01/(1.12) = $1.79 PV 02007 = $2.31/(1.12)2 = $1.84 PV om = $2.66/(1.12)3 = $1.89 PV D2009 = $3.06/(1.12)4 = $1.94 PV D2010 = $3.52/(1.12)S = $2.00 PV of dividends = $51—35 Step 2: F320. om : 020.0(1 +g) _ $3.52(1.05) _ $3.70 = $52.80 = r. —9. r5 —gn ‘ 0.12—0.05 ‘ 0.07 This is the price of the stock 5 years from now. The PV of this price, discounted back 5 years, is as follows: PV of 13m, = $52.80/(1.12)5 = $29.96 Step 3: The price of the stock today is as follows: 130 = PV dividends Years 2006-2010 + PV of 13m = $9.46 + $29.96 = $39.42. This problem could also be solved by substituting the proper values into the following equation: A 5 l 5 P0 =ZD°(1+951) + D6 1 . [.1 (1+rs) rs -gn 1+r5 12 Integrated Case Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Calculator solution: Input 0, 2.01, 2.31, 2.66, 3.06, 56.32 (3.52 + 52.80) into the cash flow register, input I/YR = 12, PV = ? PV 2 $39.43. C- M D1/P0 = $2.01/$39.43 = 5.10% Capital gains yield = 6.90* Expected total return = 12.00% am Dfi/PS = $3.70/$52.80 = 7.00% Capital gains yield 2 5.00 Expected total return = 12.00% *We know that rs is 12%, and the dividend yield is 5.10%; therefore, the capital gains yield must be 6.90%. The main points to note here are as follows: 1. The total yield is always 12% (except for rounding errors). 2. The capital gains yield starts relatively high, then declines as the supernormal growth period approaches its end. The dividend yield rises. 3. After 12/31/ 10, the stock will grow at a 5% rate. The dividend yield will equal 7%, the capital gains yield will equal 5%, and the total return will be 12%. d. People in high—income tax brackets will be more inclined to purchase “growth” stocks to take the capital gains and thus delay the payment of taxes until a later date. The firm's stock is “mature" at the end of 2010. e. Since the firm’s supernormal and normal growth rates are lower, the dividends and, hence, the present value of the stock price will be lower. The total return from the stock will still be 12%, but the dividend yield will be larger and the capital gains yield will be smaller than they were with the original growth rates. This result occurs because we assume the same last dividend but a much lower current stock price. f. As the required return increases, the price of the stock goes down, but both the capital gains and dividend yields increase initially. Of course, the long-term capital gains yield is still 4%, so the long-term dividend yield is 10%. Chapter 9: Stocks and Their Valuation Integrated Case 13 ...
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