Chapter 13 - The Presidency

Chapter 13 - The Presidency - QuickTimeTM and a...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Presidency  QuickTime * and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. kTime and a essed) decompressor see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Presidential Constituencies Presidents find it challenging to find the right balance between their national constituencies created by the general election and their partisan constituencies, shaped by the presidential primaries. Both are important and both play a role in presidential decision making.
Image of page 2
Partisan Support in Congress Presidents must consider their level of support in Congress. Cannot take action on pledges without it When they have large majorities in Congress, they are more likely to get their proposed legislation approved. Divided government: the control of the presidency by one party and the control of one or both houses of Congress by the other
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Separate Institutions Sharing Power Presidents also face the fundamental divisions of power between the executive and legislative branches. cannot force members of Congress to support presidential initiatives must persuade
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Power to Inform and Persuade The President “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union.” no congressional check State of the Union address Early Use of Persuasion Power Early presidents rarely spoke in public. Modern Persuasion Power bully pulpit
Image of page 6
Neustadt: Power to Persuade “I sit here all day trying to persuade people to do the things they ought to have sense enough to do without my persuading them…That’s all the powers of the President amount to.” -President Truman “The essence of a President’s persuasive task is to convince such men that what the White House wants of them is what they ought to do for their sake and on their authority” -Neustadt Related concept: “Going Public” (Kernell)
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern