Chapter 12 - Congress and Its Work

Chapter 12 - Congress and Its Work - The U.S Congress...

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The U.S. Congress
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Congress: The First Branch (interstate, not intra state)
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Congress: The First Branch Congress is bicameral consisting of two chambers. Upper is the Senate. Lower is the House of Representatives. Supported by staffs and other institutions. Library of Congress General Accounting Office Congressional Budget Office
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The Organization of Congress The two chambers have evolved to meet the demands of law making. The division of labor created the committee system. The need to organize large numbers of people to make decisions led to the party leadership structure.
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The Congressional Parties: The House Speaker of the House The presiding office of the House of Representatives; normally the Speaker is the leader of the majority party. Majority Leader Speaker’s chief lieutenant in the House and the most important officer in the Senate. He or she is responsible for managing the floor. Minority Leader leader of the minority party who speaks for the party in dealing with the majority Whips members of Congress who serve as informational channels between the leadership and the rank and file, conveying the leadership’s views and intentions to the members and vice versa QuickTime ) and decompressor are needed to see th QuickTime and a decompressor are needed to see th QuickTime a decompress are needed to see QuickTime and decompressor are needed to see th QuickTime a decompress are needed to see
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The Congressional Parties: The House Party Caucus All Democratic members of the House or Senate. Members in caucus elect the party leaders, ratify the choice of committee leaders, and debate party positions on issues. Party Conference What Republicans call their party caucus.
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The Congressional Parties: The Senate Given that the Senate usually includes two members from each state—an even number — some tie-breaking mechanism is necessary. The Constitution provides the vice-president with the authority to preside over the Senate and to cast a tie-breaking vote when necessary. The president pro-tempore serves as Senate presiding officer in the vice-president’s absence (which is nearly all the time). QuickTim decomp are needed QuickTim decom are neede QuickTim decom are neede QuickTim decom are neede QuickTime ± and a decompressor are needed to see this
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The Congressional Parties: The Senate Senate leadership has a structure of whips and expert staff. Senate leaders are not as strong as those in the House.
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This note was uploaded on 07/21/2008 for the course GOV 310L taught by Professor Kieth during the Summer '07 term at University of Texas.

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Chapter 12 - Congress and Its Work - The U.S Congress...

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