Chapter 9 The - The Media 1 Development of the Mass Media Mass media forms of communication that are technologically capable of reaching most

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1 The Media
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2 Development of the Mass Media Mass media forms of communication that are technologically capable of reaching most people and economically affordable to most have existed for less than two centuries Early newspapers weeklies no reporters So they basically printed anything and everything.
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3 The Partisan Press and the Penny Press As party politics developed, so did the parties’ relationships with newspapers. most were one-sided printed the party line Until the Civil War, almost all newspapers were partisan. many received subsidies or patronage from the party’s supporters
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4 The Partisan Press and the Penny Press Technological improvements made it easier to publish newspapers. Penny Press still partisan, but less direct influence development of reporters
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5 Newspapers and Magazines 1865–1920 Publishers began to see that they need not alienate potential readers with highly partisan offerings. Partisanship confined to editorial pages Yellow journalism Magazines — the first major national medium McClure’s Cosmopolitan Munsey’s Later Collier’s and the Saturday Evening Post Aimed at larger national audience of middle-class, educated readers Muckraking
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6 Radio 1920 – three important characteristics of U.S. radio licensing system Brought with it the equal-time rule and fairness doctrine (gone now) importance of advertising emergence of national networks
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7 Television The first public demonstration of television took place at the N.Y. World’s Fair in 1939. May, 1949 – 6 percent of Americans owned a television set. Less than half of the public had ever seen a television program. Ownership jumped to 45 percent in 1952 and to 90 percent in 1959.
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8 The Media Today Television 99 percent of all households in U.S. have at least one television. Average has four. The network system had dominated, but has declined dramatically due to UHF and cable. Newspapers decline in number of cities with more than one newspaper spread of chain ownership Radio not dominant, but popular growth of talk radio (satellites allow for transmission of one program to hundreds of stations) [largely due to the repeal of fairness doctrine ] Magazines
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This note was uploaded on 07/21/2008 for the course GOV 310L taught by Professor Kieth during the Summer '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Chapter 9 The - The Media 1 Development of the Mass Media Mass media forms of communication that are technologically capable of reaching most

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