Plato, The Repiublic, Book II. About the nature of Justice - Section Two Week 3 Lecture Notes Plato The Repiublic Book II About the nature of Justice

Plato, The Repiublic, Book II. About the nature of Justice...

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Section Two Week 3. Lecture Notes: Plato, The Repiublic, Book II. About the nature of Justice Section Two: Week 3 Are There Moral Truths? Thinking about Ethics. Plato (the fundamental questions about justice, honesty and corruption. Hello class! Thank you for your interesting and diverse comments about the Socrates' trial and his last teachings to his jurors and the upcoming generations. This week we will explore the nature of morality and Ethics, we will continue in ancient Greece by reading about Plato and his debate about justice and honesty. Plato is perhaps the most influential thinker in western culture. He wrote about almost every subject that deals with human nature. Included in the lecture of this week is the story of the "Ring of Gyges" an
old legend that is the origin of the trilogy "The Lord of the Rings" . The ethical ideals of Plato were carried out by Tolkien and his fictional characters, who faced the old an fundamental moral question of how should I lived my life?. For those of you who already have read the Lord of the Rings, you might wish to post some comparison/contrasts to the ring of power which is at the heart of that story after having read the section on the Ring of Gyges. There is a lot of 'philosophy' in Tolkien's epic novel (not just related to the ring) and you may find yourself looking at it in a different light. ________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ By the end of this week you should have read: Read: Chapter 3 "Know Thyself?" pages 91-97, fifth esidtion from The Philosopher's Way Read: Ch.8 "Your Moral Compass and Ethical Relativism" pages 402-425, fifth edition from (TPW) Read: Ch 8 "Egoism as a Universal principle and the Myth of Gyges" pages 425-428. fifth eddition from (TPW) Read: This page completely which includes 1. My lecture about Plato (below) 2. Regarding "The Republic" by Douglas J. Soccio Optionl: Review: The Sophists (The Internet Encyclopedia of Phil.) posted on Section Two Lecture Notes, week one Review: Protagoras of Abdera (The Internet Encyclopedia of Phil.) posted on Section Two Lecture Notes, week one Movies for the 2 following weeks: "The Trilogy of the Lord of the Rings" If you haven't read these delighted and extraordinary books, enjoy the unique fantasy that Peter Jackson (film director) has captured for posterity by bringing the Middle Earth to the screen. For this week you have to watch: The Fellowship of the Ring ( my copy is on RESERVE at the Library of Cerro Coso) for all of you who live here in Ridgecrest or near by. My lecture about Plato: PROFILE: Aristocles, a.k.a. "PLATO" (c. 427-347 B. C. ) "Plato" was the nickname of an Athenian whose true name was
Aristocles . The nickname, which means "broad shoulders," stuck, and so did this man’s philosophy. Few individuals, if any, have had more influence on Western thought than Plato. Plato initially studied with Cratylus, who was a follower of Heraclitus, and then with Socrates. He was also influenced by the Pythagoreans, from whom he may have derived his great respect for mathematics. Plato thought that the study of mathematics was a necessary introduction to philosophy, and it

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