2_scalp - Superior View of the Skull(Norma Verticalis Anteriorly the frontal bone articulates with the two parietal bones AT THE CORONAL SUTURE The two

2_scalp - Superior View of the Skull(Norma Verticalis...

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Superior View of the Skull ( Norma Verticalis ) Anteriorly the frontal bone articulates with the two parietal bones AT THE CORONAL SUTURE The two parietal bones articulate in the midline AT THE SAGITTAL SUTURE lambdoid sutures
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To assist one in memorizing the names of the five layers of the scalp, use each letter of the word SCALP to denote the layer of the scalp .
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P periosteum
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The Scalp The scalp consists of FIVE LAYERS S-skin C-connective tissue (dense ) A-aponeurotic layer L-loose connective tissue P-pericranium The first three of which are intimately bound together and move as a unit 1 - Skin is thick contains hair and contains numerous sebaceous glands
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Sebaceous cyst
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2 - Connective tissue Made of fibrous fascia and septa which unite the skin to the underlying aponeurosis of the occipitofrontalis muscle Contains numerous arteries and veins !!! It is often difficult to stop the bleeding of a scalp wound because the arterial walls are attached to fibrous septa in the subcutaneous tissue and are unable to contract or retract to allow blood clotting to take place Local pressure applied to the scalp is the only satisfactory method of stopping the bleeding
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3-Aponeurosis (epicranial), is a thin, tendinous sheet that unites the occipital and frontal bellies of the occipitofrontalis muscle Epicranail aponeurosis The lateral margins of the aponeurosis are attached to the temporal fascia. The subaponeurotic space is the potential space beneath the epicranial aponeurosis . The tension of the epicranial aponeurosis, produced by the tone of the occipitofrontalis muscles, is important in all deep wounds of the scalp. If the aponeurosis has been divided, the
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  • Fall '16
  • Internal carotid artery, Veins of the head and neck, external carotid artery

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