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loX Rl foh'tS. Volume I.Vo /.Winter I"With firmnessinthe right":TheCreationofIVIorai HegemonyinLincoln's Second InauguralMARTHA SOLOMON*\\ i i hn i . i l K e t o \ \ . i r d n o n e ; w i t h e l ) . i r i t \t o.ill; w i t h l i r n i n e s si nt h er i g h t ,a sG o dg i v e su sI ds e et i i e r i g h t ,l e tu ss t r i \ e o i il ol i n i s ht h ew o r kw e. i r ei n ;t ob i n du pt h en a t i o n ' s w o u n d s ;t o c a r el o r h i m w h os h . i l l h a v e b o r n et h eh . i t t l e ,a n d l o r h i swK I O W,a n d h i so r p h a n ;t o d oa l l w h i c hm . i y. K h i e \ ea n d( . h e r i s haj u s t ,a n d.1l . i s t i t i g p e . K e , a m o n g o u r s e h e s ,a n dw i t ha l lWiththese wordsonMarch4,.•\hraham Lincoln closedhisbrief,butpowerful second inaugural. Arguabhamongthemost frequently citedandpraisedotpresidential inaugurals,this speechhasbeen closely studiedas thefullest e.xpressionofLincoln'sparticular versionofAmerican political religion (Thurow , 19'^6),as astate-mentofhis\iew ofthe ultimate meaningol the Ci\ ilWar (Anderson, 1970),andas anoutstanding; exampleofthe genreofinaugural addresses (Camp-hell>S.Jamieson,1^)SS).1heeloquenceand\ision, particularh'in thefinalpass.i^e,ha\c ledmost criticstoagree\\ ithFarl\\\Wiles'in hisessa\'inthe//istory ci)ui(rtt/cisni ofW/nertcan l^tihlic .\ddresswho concludedthatinthespeech Lincoln became"the \oiceofthepeople"(1943.P-s"4)and \\ ith Dan IHahnandAnne Morlanclowhonoted "Lincoln,u

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