Subramanian

Subramanian - Micro and Nanorobotic Assembly Using...

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327 Abstract The contact phase of an assembly task involving micro and nano objects is complicated by the presence of surface and intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, surface-tension and Van der Waals forces. Assembly strategies must account for the presence of these forces in order to guarantee successful repeatable micro and nanoassemblies with high precision. A detailed model for this electrostatic interaction is developed and analyzed. Based on the results of this analysis, dielectrophoretic assembly principles of MEMS/NEMS devices are proposed and experimentally verified with microtweezers for micro Ni parts and with nanoelectrodes fabricated with electron-beam lithography for carbon nanotube assembly. The successful manipulation and assembly of single carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using dielectrophoretic forces produced by nanoelectrodes will lead to a higher integration of CNTs into both nanoelectronics and NEMS. Index Terms Microassembly, nanoassembly, MEMS, NEMS, dielectrophoresis, carbon nanotubes I. INTRODUCTION HE scaling of micro/nanoparts leads to the dominance of surface and intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, van der Waals, and surface tension forces. This dominance also results in complications in part handling and micro/nanomanipulation for creating component assemblies. Interactive forces are highly dependent on the operating environment and material properties of the contacting surfaces [1, 2, 3] making a priori estimation of these forces difficult. As a result, assembly strategies must be developed that account for interactive forces during all contact phases of the assembly. This requires a model of the interactive forces for understanding their influence on the assembly configuration. A. Subramanian is with the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems (IRIS) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zürich (telephone: +41 44 632 68 64, email: arun@ethz.ch ). B. Vikramaditya is with Seagate Technology, Bloomington, MN 55435 (telephone: +1-952-402-8521, email: Barmeshwar.Vikramaditya@seagate. com ). L.X. Dong is with IRIS at ETH, Zürich (telephone: +41 44 632 25 39, email: ldong@ethz.ch ). D. Bell is with IRIS at ETH, Zürich (telephone: +41 44 632 68 64, email: dbell@ethz.ch ). B.J. Nelson heads IRIS at ETH, Zürich (telephone: +41 44 632 55 29, email: bnelson@ethz.ch ). As pointed out by Feddema et al. [4] the geometric constraints of the assembly planner and the free space path planning of the motion planner remain unchanged in the micro-domain. However, fine motion planning and precision motion at micro and nanoscales differ, particularly where contact is involved. Reversing the motion used to pick up a part will generally not release it. The specification of goals is different and must be correctly modeled. Another important difference in manipulation at micro and
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Subramanian - Micro and Nanorobotic Assembly Using...

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