HISTORY 110 Syllabus - HISTORY 110 Dr Julian Madison Spring...

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HISTORY 110 Dr. Julian Madison Spring 2016 Engleman C219C Phone: 2-5604 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: TR 11-1; M 2-4 Why Study HISTORY ? Perhaps the best explanation for studying history was given by the blind Czech historian Milan Hubl to the novelist Milan Kundera: “The first step in liquidating a people is to erase its memory. Destroy its books, its culture, its history . Then have somebody write new books, manufacture a new culture, invent a new history . Before long the nation will forget what it is and what it was. The world around it will forget even faster.” (Source: Milan Kundera, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting ) Remember that you are responsible for your education. Attendance is not mandatory but you should make every attempt to attend each class. From time to time in class extra credit assignments are given. There will be no makeup for these assignments. Moreover, attending class will give you a better understanding of the events that shaped the growing American empire. Finally, regular attendance is a component of the participation grade. This could be the difference between a higher grade and a lower grade. Having harped on grades let me give you one piece of advice. Do not focus on grades. Focus on learning the material and becoming the most educated person you can be. If you learn the material the final grade will take care of itself. Finally, if by chance you do not do well in the course and finish with a poor grade please do no ask for extra credit. It would not be fair to those who did the work during the semester nor would it be fair to others who may not have done well. Do the work, come to me for extra help, and learn the material. That will prevent any and all end of semester problems. Course Description: American from the colonial period to Reconstruction. Emphasis is on political, social, economic, and cultural developments. Course Goals: To demonstrate in a clear and unambiguous manner how subject matter can enhance understanding of human society and the ways it is organized. To introduce students to explanations developed by scholars for observed societal and institutional behavior. To provide the tools necessary to help interpret significant events in the past and analyze current and future issues related to human societies and institutions.
To introduce students to the concepts of diversity and its relationship to human societies and institutions in the United States. Learner Outcomes and Assessments: At the completion of the semester, students will: 1. Develop a better understanding of the forces that shaped American history.

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