2. Managing Equal Opportunity and Diversity - Managing Equal Opportunity and Diversity I dont think a day goes by without news of a new equal

2. Managing Equal Opportunity and Diversity - Managing...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 12 pages.

Managing Equal Opportunity and Diversity I don’t think a day goes by without news of a new equal opportunity related lawsuit Federal law protects individuals in many different ways: Age Disability Genetic Information National Origin Pregnancy Race/Color Religion Sex Sexual Harassment Sexual Orientation Marital Status Equal Pay and Compensation EEOC 2015 Statistics Discrimination charges were up slightly from 2014 to 2015 from 88,778 to 89,385 In terms of the volume of charges by protected class, the highest percentages were: Retaliation – 44.5% Race – 34.7% ADA/Disability – 30.2% Sex/Gender – 29.5% The categories that increased in number of filings were: Retaliation Disability Age national origin religion Disability charges cited most frequently were back impairments orthopedic impairments depression anxiety disorder diabetes The EEOC received 257 charges related to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) 2011 was its first official full year of enforcement prohibits discrimination on the basis of genetic information, including family medical history Obviously a matter of great concern to all employers
Image of page 1
So it’s no wonder that a Business Week survey indicates that more than 40% of employers now carry employment practices liability insurance Understanding equal opportunity law is essential for all managers today Brief Background Legislation barring discrimination is nothing new The 5 th amendment to the U.. Constitution states that “no person shall… be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of the law.” Big problem; we can change laws and then decide whether or not to enforce them But, changing people’s hearts is a lot harder No dramatic change until the early 1960’s. Equal Employment Opportunity Laws Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (as amended in 1972) It shall be unlawful employment practice for an employer; To fail or refuse to hire or to discharge an individual or otherwise to discriminate against and individual with respect to his or her compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. To limit, segregate, or classify his or her employees or applicants for employment in any way that would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his or her status as an employee, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was instituted by Title VII. The members are appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate for 5 year terms.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture