FM 38-700 Packaging of Materiel - Preservation

FM 38-700 Packaging of Materiel - Preservation - FM 38-700...

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FM 38-700 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY FIELD MANUAL FM 38-700 MARINE CORPS ORDER MCO P4030.31D DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PUBLICATION NAVSUP PUB 502 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE PAMPHLET AFPAM(I) 24-237 DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY INSTRUCTION DLAI 4145.14 PACKAGING OF MATERIEL PRESERVATION DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY, THE NAVY, THE AIR FORCE, AND THE DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY 700 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved f or public release; distribution is unlimited.
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*FM 38-700 MCO P4030.31D NAVSUP PUB 502 AFPAM(I) 24-237 DLAI 4145.14 DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY, NAVY, AND AIR FORCE, AND THE DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY PACKAGING OF MATERIEL PRESERVATION CHAPTER PAGE CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION – PACKAGING POLICY GENERAL ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 UNIT PACK ................................................................................................................... 1-1 INTERMEDIATE PACK .............................................................................................. 1-1 EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL HANDLING ........................................................ 1-2 LEVELS OF PROTECTION ........................................................................................ 1-3 ELECTROSTATIC SENSITIVE DISCHARGE (ESDS) ITEMS ................................ 1-3 PROTECTING RETROGRADE CARGO OR RETURNED MATERIEL .................. 1-3 OTHER POLICY REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................... 1-4 CHAPTER 2 – CLEANING AND DRYING BASIC CLEANING PRINCIPLES .............................................................................. 2-1 CLEANING REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................... 2-2 PROCESS SELECTION REQUIRMENTS ................................................................. 2-2 CLEANING PROCESSES ............................................................................................ 2-4 ULTRASONIC CLEANING (FIGURE 2-36) ............................................................... 2-45 DRYING PROCEDURES ............................................................................................. 2-53 JET SPRAY WASHING ................................................................................................ 2-54 NAVY'S HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REDUCTION PROGRAMS ........................... 2-58 CHAPTER 3 – PRESERVATIVES AND THEIR APPLICATION BASIC PRINICPLES OF PRESERVATIVES PROTECTION ................................... 3-1 CLASSIFICATION OF PRESERVATIVES ................................................................ 3-4 PERMANENT PRESERVATIVES FOR METALS ..................................................... 3-4 CHEMICAL CONVERSION COATINGS ................................................................... 3-5 * This field manual supersedes DLAM 4145.2, Vol I/TM 38-230-1/ AFP 71-15, Vol 1/NAVSUP PUB 502, Rev. Vol 1/MCO P4030.31C, Packaging of Materiel – Preservation (Volume I), August 1982 i
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CHAPTER 3 PRESERVATIVES AND THEIR APPLICATION (CONTINUED) PRESERVATIVES FOR NONMETALS ...................................................................... 3-8 CONTACT PRESERVATIVES FOR METALS ........................................................... 3-10 LUBRICANTS AND TEMPORARY PRESERVATIVES OTHER THAN CONTACT PRESERVATIVES ................................................................................ 3-12 METHODS OF APPLYING PRESERVATIVES TO METAL ITEMS ....................... 3-16 VOLATILE CORROSION INHIBITORS (VCI) .......................................................... 3-25 CHAPTER 4 – METHODS OF PRESERVATION (UNIT PACK) GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND REUQIREMENTS ................................................... 4-1 SOURCES OF PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS ....................................................... 4-2 PACKAGING MATERIALS ......................................................................................... 4-4 CUSHIONING MATERIALS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS ................................... 4-16 HEAT SEALING ........................................................................................................... 4-36 CONSTRUCTION OF METHODS OF PRESERVATION ......................................... 4-41 METHOD 20 – PRESERVATIVE COATING ONLY (WITH GREASEPROOF WRAP, AS REQUIRED) ............................................................. 4-54 METHOD 30 – WATERPROOF OR WATERPROOF-GREASEPROOF PROTECTION WITH PRESERVATIVE AS REQUIRED .................................... 4-58 METHOD 40 – WATERVAPORPROOF PROTECTION WITH PRESERVATIVE AS REQUIRED .......................................................................... 4-65 METHOD 50 – WATERVAPORPROOF PROTECTION WITH DESICCANT ............................................................................................................ 4-76 QUANTITY PER UNIT PACK (QUP) ......................................................................... 4-90 QUALITY ASSURANCE PROVISIONS ..................................................................... 4-90 LEAKAGE TESTS ........................................................................................................ 4-92 HEAT-SEALED SEAM TEST ...................................................................................... 4-94 CONTAINER PERFORMANCE TESTING ................................................................ 4-97 DETERMINATION OF PRESERVATION RETENTION ......................................... 4-99 DISPOSITION OF SAMPLES ..................................................................................... 4-101 MARKING UNIT AND INTERMEDIATE PACKS .................................................... 4-101 CHAPTER 5 – SPRAYABLE, STRIPPABLE FILMS AND CONTROLLED HUMIDITY SPRAYABLE, STRIPPABLE FILMS GENERAL ..................................................................................................................... 5-1 CONTROLLED HUMIDITY ........................................................................................ 5-3 CHAPTER 6 – FIBERBOARD AND PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 6-1 FIBERBOARD BOXES ................................................................................................. 6-1 PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS ................................................................................... 6-14 FOLDING PAPERBOARD BOXES ............................................................................. 6-15 SETUP BOXES (PPP-B-676) ....................................................................................... 6-17 METAL-EDGED PAPERBOARD BOXES (PPP-B-665) ............................................. 6-22
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