u9a1-Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Official Version - Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Anthony

U9a1-Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Official Version

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Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Theoretical Framework and Application 2 Anthony J. Murgatroyd COUN5239 Theories of Psychotherapy March 23, y Capella University
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Theoretical Framework and Application 1 Theoretical Analysis Basic Description of the Theory Feminist theory developed out of a grassroots movement and in response to the emerging challenges and needs of women, and in particular the need for psychotherapy to recognize and address gender role stereotypes and its impact on individuals. Its history is relatively new and grew out of the women’s movement of the 1960s. No single person is responsible for its creation (Corey, 2013). Unlike other theories, the focus in feminist theory is not as much on the client as it is on the context of the client’s culture and social environment (Corey, 2013). The feminist therapist looks at how society might be contributing to the client’s problems, behaviors, and dysfunctional thoughts (Corey, 2013). The feminist therapist is interested in gauging how cultural, societal, or political conditions might have conditioned the male or female client to adapt rigid gender roles (Corey, 2013). For example, the feminist therapist may explore with the client the societal notion that men should be aggressive and unemotional, or that woman should not be assertive and independent. The counseling relationship is egalitarian. It is a collaborative approach. The feminist therapist wants to teach clients how the process works. Through getting the client to see the cultural and societal expectations, feminist theory believes the client can develop insight and make choices in how they want to live their life. Empowering the client is also a very important part of this therapy, so the therapist wants to share the power with the client so that the power is not used to control or abuse the client. Psychopathology is reframed and viewed as the by- product of an unjust system. The focus is more on developing strengths and coping skills rather than pathology. Diagnosis if used, is discussed and agreed upon with the client (Corey, 2013). 2
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Theoretical Framework and Application 1 Like person-centered therapy, the therapist strives for genuineness and mutual empathy, however unlike person-centered therapy, feminist therapy does not believe the therapeutic relationship alone is sufficient to bring about change. With awareness, the feminist therapist also seeks social change (Corey, 2013). As such, social justice is a critical component of this therapy. Feminist therapists are interested in changing the role of culture in society, as well as changing the individual. In order to achieve social justice, the counselor can assume different roles, such as advocate and coach. How the Theory Aligns With My Own Philosophy and Views of the Therapeutic Process Feminist theory does align with my own philosophy and views of the therapeutic process.
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