Language Acquisition ePortfolio

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Unformatted text preview: Language Acquisition ePortfolio Nora Balderas ECE 315: Language Development in Young Children (BDG1613A) Instructor: Carly Davenport April 24, 2016 Introduction My name is Nora Balderas and I live in San Antonio, Texas. I am 30 years old and the mother of three wonderful children. My oldest is Adrian he is 12 years old and loves sports and math. My daughter Aryana is 5 going on 21 and she thinks she is always right. She is spunky and full of life. My baby boy Ayden is two and keeps me on my toes at all times. My children’s father and I are no longer together but due to his battle with cancer He has moved back into our home. My professional goal is to obtain a Bachelor’s in Child Development and work for Child Protective Services. My goal is to help every child that I may come in contact with. I have seen way too many children who have been abused and neglected from all of my years in childcare. I was the Director at my old center so I was constantly communicating with others. I believe I am a people person so I am very easy to talk to. One of my strengths when communicating with others is that I listen and respect everyone whether I agree or disagree with them. My favorite literacy experience I will use in my classroom is reading out loud and having conversations with my kiddos. I currently work with infants and of course they can’t talk yet but by hearing me talk and read or listening to music it builds their literacy. Children are our future and I think it is important to have people who love to work with children and want to help them become successful members of society. Summary of Beliefs The purpose of acquiring language is to make meaning with words. Children start learning language from the day they are born through interactions with their family and later on with friends. The main components of language acquisition are phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and an extensive vocabulary. It is very important that we as teachers cover each component to set the children up for success in their language development. Language-Rich Environment I will create a classroom floor plan that foster’s language development and it will describe each aspect of the three physical areas designed of the classroom. I will provide learning centers for my students. Each learning center will focus on a specific feature of language development. I will provide an explanation of how my classroom floor plan supports language development. The first physical center of language development will be a center for the kids to read freely. It will be called “Library Center”. It will have lots of different reading material such as books, audio books, and magazines. I will also make it comfortable for the children by offering pillows and soft chairs to lounge on. The second physical center that promotes language development will be “Dramatic Play”. In this center the children will have access to materials such as kitchen supplies, dress up, and other things needed to play pretend. The children will learn to play the role they see fit for themselves. I know being the “mom” is always the best choice. The kids build their vocabulary by talking to each other and it also helps develop cognition awareness. The third and final physical center will be a “Technology Center”. The students will have an opportunity to choose the activity they want to participate in. The Center will have two desktops, an iPad, and several leap frog tablets. This center allows the children to become familiar with technology as well as being able to have a visual of what they are trying to do. They will have access to the internet so they can get on learning websites such as ABC mouse. There are lots of ways to create a language rich environment in our classroom. I know an affective way is by labeling everything accompanied by a visual picture of the word. For example: We can also have word walls with sight words or display the colors and shapes with their names. These physical centers are designed based on language development and include all features needed to support language development. As long as we continue to communicate with our kids we will always be helping them build their language development. Some kids will need more help than others but that is the beauty of being a teacher we can help each and every one who needs our help. Stages of Language Development Interview with Catherine Padilla Nora Balderas ECE315: Language Development in Young Children (BDG1613A) Professor: Carly Davenport I chose to interview Catherine Padilla who has a Master’s degree of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with a minor in Early Childhood Education and is a preschool teacher at Losoya Head Start Center in San Antonio, Texas. She has been a teacher there for three years now and loves what she is doing. I chose the following five questions from the list provided. There are many approaches for working with children learning a second language. Which approach do you believe works best? Catherine Padilla: I always believed that building on the child’s first language was crucial in helping them learn that second language. They already have a general understanding of sounds and how they are used to form words to communicate so we’re just building on what they already know. How do you work to meet the language goals of all the children in your class individually? Catherine Padilla: Constant conversation I think is very important and that would be a great way to individualize each of my children’s language development. By allowing a child to take the lead on the conversation we gradually build buy modeling. What features of you physical space promote language development? I personally find that Learning Centers that allow for two or more children to interact at any given time are very beneficial in helping to promote language development period. The children will of course talk to one another and as I walk around the room they will engage me as well. How would you conduct a parent meeting with a language-focused agenda? Catherine Padilla: I am a firm believer in constant communication with parents with regards to their children’s progress. A parent meeting that would be language focus would not only discuss with parents how their child is developing in that domain it would also offer suggestions on activities that they can do at home such as read aloud the use of open-ended questions and asking the child questions about their day. What do you consider your strengths in supporting language development? Your weaknesses in supporting language development? Catherine Padilla: I would have to say that one of my greatest strengths with regard to language development is my understanding that the first language should never be discarded or built upon. I think invalidating the child’s first language we not only enable them to learn a second language but we have to validate the various cultures that they bring into the classroom. With regards to weaknesses in this area I would have to say the fact that this is an ever-evolving subject and we are always learning from it. I suppose there’s always a chance that we missed anew finding a new research-based project that would help us better serve children. I have to say that I was blown away with all of Catherine’s answers. She has given me a whole new perspective and understanding of how language development works and what I can do in the future to promote positive language development in my classroom. The way I will meet the needs of children in language development is by using modeling language. This will be used especially when I’m correcting something that they’re saying. I don’t want to put a child on the spot and make them feel like they’ve done something horribly wrong. Literacy Lesson Plan Content Area or Developmental Focus: Language Development Age/Grade of Children: 4/Pre-Kindergarten Length of Lesson: One week Goal/Objectives: Language Development: the children will be able to write or tell a similar story. Math: the children will be able to count the total number of food that the caterpillar ate. Science: the children will be able to learn sorting, and life cycle of the caterpillar. Art: children will be able to use their imagination based on the story and draw a picture to see if they understood it. Standards Included Materials The Very Hungry Caterpillar book Food and the days of the week cards Tissue paper (different colors) Glue Scissors Paint Paper Markers Life cycle cards Introduction Lesson Development The book can be introduced during morning circle time as a role playing activity with the teacher and the students. Use a felt board with all the pieces that will be a part of the story. Activity #1: Food and Days of the week cards Read “ The Very Hungry Caterpillar” during circle time Give each student a food or day of the week card and a piece of yarn. Ask the students to put the piece of yarn through the punched holes in the cards and wear the cards like a necklace. Give the students an example on how they are going to participate as we read the story. Activity #2: The life Cycle of a butterfly Read ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar” during circle time. Ask children to re-tell the story. Give each child a life of cycle card along with a piece of yarn. Ask the children to put the piece of yarn through the punched holes in the cards and wear the cards around their necks. Depending on the weather take the children for a walk as we talk about the cycle of life of butterflies. Use body movements to teach the lifecycle of a butterfly: o Egg: have the children hold their ankles; ask them to bend down, and round their bodies like the shape of an egg. o Larva: let’s all squirm like a worm (safely on the carpet) - remind children that safety comes first and they cannot squirm like a worm on top of their friends. o Pupa: Crawl into their sleeping bags or cots. If none available: bring pillowcases for children to use. Butterfly: the children come out of their sleeping bags/cots or pillowcases and swing their arms around like a butterfly. Activity #3: Let’s make a collage Show the children the pictures on the books. Speak to the children about the author, and the author’s ideas behind the book. Ask the children to pick their favorite scene on the book and create a collage with the materials in front of them Hang their art work around the classroom. Encourage parents to ask children about the story, what they learn, and their art work; promoting imagination/creativity. Activity # 4: Write Your Own Story Re-read the story of ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’. Ask the children which activity has been their favorite so far. Answer questions Discuss with the children what it means to be an author and explains to them that they will be writing their own story. Ask the children to write and or draw a story similar to ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar” Have the children read their books during the afternoon circle time. Assessment (Practice/ Checking for Understanding) At the end of the week, the students will: Demonstrate their comprehension and knowledge by re-telling the story using their own words. Use the felt board to re-telling of the story. Ask questions specifically addressing: who, what, where, why and when. Show pictures and ask whether it relates to the story or not; if so, ask how. Closing Ask children to share their favorite activity of the week. Retell the story from the point of view of the caterpillar. Ask the class to put together a puppet show based on the book. Provide children with different book choices for the upcoming week lessons. Language Reflection A communication disorder is something that affects an individuals ability to use language. As a teacher or childcare provider, it is important to be knowledgeable of different kinds of communication disorders and to be able to recognize the signs of a child possibly having one so the proper referrals can be made and lesson plans can be modified for the student. There are two types of communication disorders they are speech and language. A communication disorder is any kind of impairment that adversely affects a person’s ability to use language. I chose to discuss dyslexia which is a language disorder. Dyslexia is referred to a category of reading disorders associated with impairment to the ability to interpret spatial relationships (in print) or to integrate auditory and visual information. The common characteristics of dyslexia are letter reversal or mirroring, delay in speech, distractibility, difficulty with sound segments, retrieval problems, and tendency to omit or add letters when reading, and generally writing that does not match their level of intelligence or general academic understanding. Children with dyslexia go through many obstacles. Some may be failing in school and may become discouraged. If they are not diagnosed with the disorder they may have to face unnecessary consequences with their parents for failing. Some kids develop low self-esteem and may become depressed. There are many things we as teachers can do to help a child with dyslexia in our classroom some strategies that can help are to breakdown instructions and tasks, keep child on task, organize work materials, read, note down homework, and help with practical tasks. For a dyslexic child this help is very valuable. An idea or practice that can support families who have a child with dyslexia is to read. They can read aloud or listen to audiobooks. We can also reassure the family that it is not their fault that their child has this disorder. A resource that I could share with families that explains more about dyslexia is http://dyslexia.yale.edu/PAR_wordvocab.html. This website explains everything you need to know about dyslexia and offer tips for parents. I feel this topic is a perfect choice for me because my oldest son was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was second grade at the age of 8. He has gone through some trials and tribulations but I am proud to say that he is doing very well in school. How will I support Language Development as a teacher? Always keeping parents aware of the child’s progress By being an example of how to use proper language on a daily basis Not correcting or criticizing the students, but simply repeating back the right way Always being encouraging and patient with the children Using plenty of visual aids along with fun and entertaining material to assist with instructing Staying educated with the latest methods of teaching the students Language Resource File For this discussion we are asked to choose a specific language acquisition topic to explore. I chose to discuss bilingualism. The three sources that can be used to learn more about bilingualism are: http://www.nabe.org Summary: The National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE) is an organization that works to improve instructional practices for linguistically and culturally diverse children: providing bilingual educators with more high-quality professional development opportunities securing adequate funding for programs serving limited-English-proficient students: and keeping the rights of language-minority Americans clearly in focus as states and communities move forward with educational reforms. https://www.sciencedaily.com Summary: This article talks about the benefits to speaking two languages rather than one. All studies done before the 1960’s had many people believe that speaking a second language would make the children have cognitive deficiencies or even be labeled with mental retardation. Studies show that all children exposed to more than one language is considered to be bilingual. http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.proxy-library.ashford.edu Summary: This article talks about research findings on dual language learning in both school and non-school settings, among simultaneous and sequential bilinguals, and in typically developing learners and those with an impaired capacity for language learning. It talks about the myth of monolingual brain, the myth that younger is better, the myth of time-on-task, and the myth that bilingualism is not advisable for children with developmental disorders or academic challenges. By having all of this information on bilingualism it will help me make every child feel safe and secure in the classroom. I know from experience how being bilingual can make you feel as if you don’t belong. I can recall being in elementary and being an outcast because I was put in the class where the teacher spoke Spanish. It made me feel unwanted and I will use what I have learned and my own personal experience to help each child in my classroom. References American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2013). Speech and language disorders and diseases. Retrieved from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/ Carle, Eric. The Very Hungry Caterpillar. New York: Harper's Inc., 1980. Genesee, F. (2015). Myths about early childhood bilingualism. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie Canadienne, 56(1), 6-15. doi:10.1037/a0038599 http://www.nabe.org Padilla, C. (2016) Piper, T. (2012). Making meaning, making sense: Children’s early language learning. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education. Singapore Management University. (2015, August 24). Bilingualism and the brain: How language shapes our ability to process information. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2016 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150824114907.htm ...
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