BIO 1AA3 Test 1 Review Session

BIO 1AA3 Test 1 Review Session - BIO 1AA3 - Test 1 - Review...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BIO 1AA3 - Test 1 - Review Session Evolution: Change in allele frequencies in a population over time. Concludes that: Species change over time Species are related Species Change over Time - Fossils a) Age of Earth b) Extinction c) Transitional Forms d) Environmental Change - Vestigial Traits i.e.: human appendix/cecum; goosebumps - Observed Change a) Evolution seen occurring in extant species b) I.e.: peppered moth, P. flourescens (test-tube experiement) - So this evidence supports that species do change in time (immutable) - Use homologies to make phylogenetic trees. Homology – similar traits derived from common ancestor Structural Homology – similar morphological structures Developmental Homology – similar embryonic development stages Genetic Homology – similar DNA sequences Homology vs. Analogy Homologous trait – similar traits from common ancestor Analagous trait – similar traits not from common ancestor (wings; birds and bats = no common ancestor) Note: Analagous Traits and Convergent Evolution: No common ancestor. Chapter 24 Population - Group of individuals from the same species that live in the same area and interbreed Genetic Variation - Number and relative frequency of alleles present in a population Mechanisms of Evolution - Natural Selection - Stabilizing Selection - Disruptive Selection
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Natural Selection - Increased frequencies of alleles that contribute to fitness - Those that have favourable phenotypes are able to pass on their alleles - Directional selection: changes allele frequency distributions in one direction - Stabilizing selection: changes allele frequency distributions to reduce extremes - Disruptive selection: changes allele frequency distributions to favour extremes Sexual Selection - Individuals in a population differ in their ability to attract a mate - Bateman-rivers Theory: sexual selection acts on males, therefore traits that attract the
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

BIO 1AA3 Test 1 Review Session - BIO 1AA3 - Test 1 - Review...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online