NursingInterview - What was the highest degree you earned...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

What was the highest degree you earned, and where did you go to school? “I went to CMMC School of Nursing, and then obtained my associates through UMA (1984). I really loved it, and I felt like I found what I was going to do for the rest of my life.” Why did you decide to be an RN? “Growing up, I was always involved in health care. I worked as CNA in high school, but I was more interested in Occupational Therapy. I looked into schools for OT, but I fell in love with nursing, and it made more sense for me to go that route at the time. I have absolutely no regrets for choosing nursing.” Can you describe your daily roles the first year after graduation when you were hired to work in the hospital? “I worked in oncology as a staff nurse. I worked the floor with 2 other RNs, a charge nurse, and 2 CNAs. We were in charge of caring for 30 patients (at max). I did chemo administration. At that time, oncology was mainly inpatient, so we would have patients with us for a few days, and then they would go home. Now, chemotherapy is more outpatient than inpatient. I did a lot of work with IVs and IV meds. As a nurse, you deal with the personal care for the patient. I did a lot of this, especially for oncology. At that time, the CNAs and LPNs could not do as much, so more of the care was up to me. I made care plans, delegated tasks to other nurses and CNAs, and other staff. “ How has nursing changed since you were in school? “So much has changed. Between the new systems, new equipment, drugs, and technology in general, healthcare as a whole has advanced. Before, nursing was very hands on, with limited support staff. A lot of the times, I would be doing the same work that CNAs today primarily do. We didn’t have a lot of the support staff, like pharmacy techs, back then. Also, the IV access was different. Before, we had singe line pumps that would only administer 1 portion of IV fluid at a time, and several pumps would be hooked up to the patients at different parts of their body. This made it so it took longer to get the fluids into the body, and the patient was very uncomfortable. Today, nursing uses multichamber pumps. I was one of the first nurses to be trained to use multichamber pumps in CMMC. This made it so we could preprogram medications to

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture