booth - In Shakespeares play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and Sophocles play Antigone both authors show the consequences of civil disobedience In

booth - In Shakespeares play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar...

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In Shakespeare’s play, “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar”, and Sophocles’ play, “Antigone”, both authors show the consequences of civil disobedience. In “Antigone,” Antigone’s is obligated by her religious belief to bury her brother and is imprisoned by Creon. In “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar,” Brutus, on the other hand, is going against the law and killing Caesar for his political beliefs. It is often said that loyalty is the most overrated virtue in politics. John Wilkes Booth’s Final Diary Entry was written as an attempt to justify and rationalize his actions to himself and the public. The three texts have a similar theme, in that all of them deal with civil disobedience. Each of the main characters in the works have a deep-rooted belief that they are right for what they did and were ready to suffer the consequences for their actions. When comparing the texts, it is evident that John Wilkes Booth’s Final Diary Entry most closely aligns with Shakespeare’s, “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar.”

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