Apple Case - Brief history including products high/low...

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Brief history including products, high/low points of firm, "what happened" Apple is seen today as an innovative technology company with soaring profits and market share. However, this was not always the case. Apple was founded and run out of a garage by two young electronic enthusiasts. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak’s worked together to design a computer for the fun of it. The first Apple computer, the Apple I, sold for $666. Those in the industry thought that this a joke or a prank. Later that year, Jobs and Wozniak were working on a computer to replace the Apple I. They knew that they needed help and brought on Mike Markkula and Michael Scott for tech skills and leadership. The Apple II was released in 1977 at a price of $1,200. To build on the success of the Apple II, the Apple III was introduced, but it failed due to bugs and constant crashes. The computer industry had two major market segments, personal use and business use. At the time, Apple’s competitor IBM adopted an “open architecture” purchasing many computer parts from many different suppliers. The most notable licensing agreements were for the microprocessor from Intel and the operating system from Microsoft. IBM PCs could now be run with the speed of a 16-bit processor and with the Peachtree Software office suite. This was threat to Apple because they did not yet have answer to the speed and programs offered by IBM. Apple responded by launching two projects, Lisa and Macintosh. Lisa was for high-end business users, and Macintosh was for lower-end portable machines. While the Lisa project never really took off, the Macintosh project soon began to gain momentum. Users liked it because of its graphical interface, icons, mouse, and keyboard. These features were not found on competitor’s machines. Macintosh was lacking major features such as: a disk drive, too few applications, and a much more difficult platform for developers to write compatible programs for.
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