Another type of relaxing2 - Jans1 Kelsey Jans Professor B...

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Jans1 Kelsey Jans Professor B. Estermann English 104 December 1 st ,2006 Another Type of Relaxation Every time I drive, I release my inner thoughts and think about everything that is going on in my life. Driving fast somehow soothes me and takes me to another place. For most people, driving is considered a way of relaxing and expressing a form of their freedom. But how can driving be considered another aspect of freedom if we are not truly given the chance to be free? Our true freedom is hindered by speed limits. Do we really need to have such low speed limits? Driving faster can actually be an advantage. Driving faster is safer for long commutes meaning a decrease of congestion, and a decrease in the amount of speeding tickets that are issued each year. Raising the speed limit would also decrease the amount of deaths caused by collisions on U.S. freeways. Speed limits do not prevent accidents, they can cause them. Therefore, we must raise the speed limit. The majority of people in the U.S. believe that by raising the speed limits, people will wreak havoc on the roads. William J. Holstein, Mike Tharp, and Jordan Sieder, of The American Autobahn suggest that “As cars have gotten better over the years, and the highways safer and better paved, it feels more comfortable to drive faster.” (Par.6) Many
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Jans2 people do feel safer driving faster because of the new technology in cars today. Although, many people may envision an enraged crazy person speeding behind the wheel of a Ferrari. In Germany, this is not the case. James Clash, author of Joy of Autobahn states that“The average speed for cars is 80mph; at any given moment, 15% are traveling 96mph or faster.” (Par.1) The German Autobahn is the world’s fastest freeway and having a high speed limit is not responsible for nearly as many deaths as in the U.S. As said in Stephen Moore’s article “Back to 55?” in the National Review “Higher speed limits in states are said to be the cause of more than 1,000 additional highway fatalities a year.” (Par. 1) However, this is not true. James Clash of Joy of Autobahn states that “In 2001 the death rate was 6 per billion passenger-vehicle miles, versus 8 for U.S.
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