worksheet07 - Worksheet #7 - PHY102 (Spr. 2006) Collisions...

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Unformatted text preview: Worksheet #7 - PHY102 (Spr. 2006) Collisions Due Thursday 9pm March 2th, 2006 In this worksheet, we will return to solving equations and solving differential equations. Often there are multiple ways of accomplishing something in Mathematica . Usually one way is easier than another but less elegant. Why might you want to use the elegant method rather than the easy one? Because it can often save trouble later on in your mathematica session. Here is an example. Lets say you want to know the distance a mass of 50kg falls in 30s after falling out of an airplane. Obviously we need to use y = v t + 1 2 at 2 where v = 0, t = 30 s and a =- g =- 9 . 81 m/s 2 . The simplest way is to type into mathematica: y = -9.81*302/2 . An obviously more elegant route is to type: v0=0; a=-9.81; t=30; y=v0*t + a*t2/2 or a more space-saving way would be: { v0,a,t } = { 0,-9.81,30 } ; y=v0*t + a*t2/2 The problem with both of these approaches may come later because you have permanently defined the variables v0, a and t to these values and wherever...
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worksheet07 - Worksheet #7 - PHY102 (Spr. 2006) Collisions...

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