Coursepack1 - Module 1: Course Overview Course: CSE 460...

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1 Module 1: Course Overview Course: CSE 460 Instructor: Dr. Eric Torng Grader/TA: Jignesh Patel
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2 What is this course? Philosophy of computing course We take a step back to think about computing in broader terms Science of computing course We study fundamental ideas/results that shape the field of computer science “Applied” computing course We learn study a broad range of material with relevance to computing today
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3 Philosophy Phil. of life What is the purpose of life? What are we capable of accomplishing in life? Are there limits to what we can do in life? Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways? Phil. of computing What is the purpose of programming? What can we achieve through programming? Are there limits to what we can do with programs? Why don’t debuggers actually debug programs?
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4 Science Physics Study of fundamental physical laws and phenomenon like gravity and electricity Engineering Governed by physical laws Our material Study of fundamental computational laws and phenomenon like undecidability and universal computers Programming Governed by computational laws
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5 Applied computing Applications are not immediately obvious In some cases, seeing the applicability of this material requires advanced abstraction skills Every year, there are people who leave this course unable to see the applicability of the material Others require more material in order to completely understand their application for example, to understand how regular expressions and context-free grammars are applied to the design of compilers, you need to take a compilers course
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6 Some applications Important programming languages regular expressions (perl) finite state automata (used in hardware design) context-free grammars Proofs of program correctness Subroutines Using them to prove problems are unsolvable String searching/Pattern matching Algorithm design concepts such as recursion
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7 Fundamental Theme * What are the capabilities and limitations of computers and computer programs? What can we do with computers/programs? Are there things we cannot do with computers/programs?
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8 Module 2: Fundamental Concepts Problems Programs Programming languages
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9 Problems We view solving problems as the main application for computer programs
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10 Inputs Outputs (4,2,3,1) (3,1,2,4) (7,5,1) (1,2,3) (1,2,3,4) (1,5,7) (1,2,3) Definition A problem is a mapping or function between a set of inputs and a set of outputs Example Problem: Sorting
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11 How to specify a problem Input Describe what an input instance looks like Output Describe what task should be performed on the input In particular, describe what output should be produced
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12 Example Problem Specifications* Sorting problem Input – Integers n 1 , n 2 , . .., n k Output – n 1 , n 2 , . .., n k in nondecreasing order Find element problem Input – Integers n 1 , n 2 , …, n k Search key S Output – yes if S is in n 1 , n 2 , …, n k , no otherwise
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13 Programs Programs solve problems
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Coursepack1 - Module 1: Course Overview Course: CSE 460...

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