Module07Worksheet - 3) In the number of languages proof...

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Module 7 Worksheet In Class Questions 1) (S3) Is the input a yes or no input instance to the halting problem? 2) (S3) Can you change the input x so that the input changes from yes to no or no to yes? 3) (S5) What is the earliest element of list L that is a legal program that takes as input one unsigned integer? 4) (S6) What would P H return on the input on slide 3? 5) (S6) Is there an input that will cause P H to infinite loop? 6) (S8) Assuming P H exists, does D exist as a well-formed program? 7) (S10) What needs to be proven to show that H is unsolvable? 8) (S13) Is it possible for two different rows to be completely identical? Why or why not? 9) (S14) In the example, which numbers distinguish B from the behavior of P 0 ? Which numbers distinguish B from the behavior of P 1 ? 10) (S25) Do these implications make sense? Why or why not?
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Take home review questions 1) Define the halting problem and argue it is a fundamental program behavior problem. 2) How many C++ programs are there and why?
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Unformatted text preview: 3) In the number of languages proof from module 5, we used diagonalization to produce a language that was not on the list. In the halting problem proof of module 7, we used diagonalization to produce ??? 4) Is it true that we are trying to make program D behave differently on input y than program P H behaves on input y? Explain. 5) bool main(unsigned y) { program P = generate(y); if (P H (P,y)) while (1>0); else return(yes); } program generate(unsigned y) /* generates yth program in P * */ bool P H (program P, unsigned y) /* solves Halting problem */ Describe in words what this program D does on input 5. 6) Suppose we try to prove that the Rejecting problem, defined below, is unsolvable. Will the given program D from problem 5 (replacing P H with P R ) still be guaranteed to be different than any program P? Explain why or why not. Input: program P, unsigned y Y/N question: Does P reject input y?...
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2008 for the course CSE 460 taught by Professor Torng during the Fall '07 term at Michigan State University.

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Module07Worksheet - 3) In the number of languages proof...

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