mgc2601 TAS - 2006 University of South Africa All rights reserved Printed and published by the University of South Africa Muckleneuk Pretoria

mgc2601 TAS - 2006 University of South Africa All rights...

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# 2006 University of South Africa All rights reserved Printed and published by the University of South Africa Muckleneuk, Pretoria MGG201W/1/2007±2009 98059386 3B2 A4 6pica style
(iii) MGG201W/1/2007±2009 Contents Theme Page 1 UNDERSTANDING COUPLES 1 Introduction 1 1 The tripod of couple relationships 3 1.1 Passionate attraction 3 1.1.1 Love 4 (a) Actions speak louder than verbal promises of love and devotion 5 (b) Love requires a reciprocal investment from both parties 6 (c) Love needs management 6 (d) The goal is to be just reasonably content 7 1.2 Mutual expectations 7 1.2.1 Myths 8 1.2.2 Expectations about roles and responsibilities 11 1.2.3 Expectations about life events 11 1.3 Personal intentions 12 1.4 Individual differences and their impact on the couple relationship 13 1.5 Gender differences 13 1.5.1 Similarities 13 1.5.2 Physiological differences 14 1.5.3 Differences in communication styles and patterns of emotional expression 15 1.5.4 Perceptions of rules/roles for the relationship 16 1.6 The effects of ethnicity and culture 18 1.6.1 Definition of a family 20 1.6.2 Formation of values 20 1.6.3 Culture and family life cycle transitions 21 1.6.4 Cultural practices change with time 21 1.6.5 Cross-cultural unions 22 1.7 Becoming a couple 23 1.7.1 Couple formation 25 1.7.2 Characteristics of healthy couples 26 SUMMARY 28 2 CHANGES THAT COUPLES GO THROUGH: PSYCHOLOGICAL TASKS AND FAMILY LIFE CYCLE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES 31 Introduction 31 2.1 Psychological tasks of couples in long-term relationships 34 2.1.1 Consolidating psychological separation and establishing new connections with the family of origin 34 2.1.2 Building togetherness and creating autonomy 34
(iv) Theme Page 2.1.3 Establishing a sexual identity 35 2.1.4 Establishing the relationship as a zone of safety and nurturance 36 2.1.5 Negotiating parenthood 36 2.1.6 Building a relationship that is fun and interesting 37 2.1.7 Maintaining a dual vision of each other that combines early idealisation with reality perception 38 2.2 The family life cycle 38 2.2.1 Different family life cycle theories 39 2.2.2 Stressors 41 2.2.2.1 Vertical stressors 41 2.2.2.2 Horizontal stressors 41 2.2.2.3 System-level stressors 41 2.2.3 Carter and McGoldrick's family life cycle model 44 2.2.3.1 Stage 1: the unattached young adult 44 (a) Key principle of the emotional transition of the unattached adult 45 (b) Second-order changes that have to be accomplished 45 (c) Clinical considerations 46 (d) A locally specific perspective 47 2.2.3.2 Stage 2: the joining of families through marriage 48 (a) Key principle of the emotional transition of the new couple 48 (b) Second-order changes that have to be accomplished 49 (c) Issues in marital adjustment 49 (d) Clinical considerations 50 (e) A locally specific perspective 52 (f) Clinical interventions 53 2.2.3.3 Stage 3: families with young children 54 (a) Key principle of the emotional transition of families with young children 55 (b) Second-order changes that have to be accomplished 55 (c) Clinical considerations 57 (d) A locally specific perspective 59 2.2.3.4 Stage 4: families with adolescents 60 (a) Key principle of the emotional transition of families with adolescents 60 (b) Second-order changes that have to be accomplished 61 (c) Clinical considerations 62

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