the problem of skeptism

the problem of skeptism - Kelsey Jans Philosophy Prof....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Kelsey Jans Philosophy Prof. Markle 2/1/07 Hume’s argument In my paper, I will analyze the skeptical arguments by Hume. Skeptism demonstrates to us the fact that we cannot be sure of what is true. In Hume’s Inquiry, he argues that we can never be certain that one thing causes another and that we cannot determine our future by cause and effect. By analyzing the arguments of Hume, I will pinpoint that these skeptical arguments by Hume are correct. First, Hume introduces us to impressions and ideas he distinguishes between these two perceptions of the mind. As defined by Hume, impressions consist of direct sense experiences of things outside us (sensations) or inside us (passions or emotions). He then defines ideas as copies of impressions. For example, an impression would be hearing a sound, and an idea would be recalling that sound. This example that Hume gives shows us a belief in causality which is defined as two events that are conjoined creating the idea of cause and effect. However, the idea of cause and effect is not always correct. (FRP
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/11/2008 for the course PHL 201 taught by Professor Dixon during the Spring '07 term at Cal Poly Pomona.

Page1 / 3

the problem of skeptism - Kelsey Jans Philosophy Prof....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online