Chapter 4 Essays. - 1.Describe the basic social life of seventeenth century colonists Explain the causes and effects of the Great Awakening and the

Chapter 4 Essays. - 1.Describe the basic social life of...

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1.Describe the basic social life of seventeenth century colonists. Explain the causes and effects of the Great Awakening and the Enlightenment. In your discussion explain how the Great Awakening and the Enlightenment contributed to the American Revolution. Social and Political Upheaval During the Seventeenth Century in British North America For every student, historian, profession, or average civilian, when you ask the question about early American history they will immediately and ultimately respond with one exact answer; the Puritans came to New England in search of freedom and new religion. During the late seventeenth century, religion gave the Puritans the opportunity to begin a new life, achieve social class, gain respect in the colonies, and have individual morality. Although that was a bit difficult to overcome for most Puritans; because the founders of the colonies on the mainland of British North America were in no hurry to arrange religious establishments. Laws were introduced by the Church that sidetracked the Puritans beliefs and aspirations. Political stress comes into play as soon as the civil government appoints only Puritan men the right to vote. In these colonies, a few brave Puritans were not afraid to speak their minds and stand in front of the civil government and the Church. Anne Hutchinson, Roger Williams, William Penn, Nathaniel Bacon, and many other colonists weren’t afraid to disagree and go against this new Puritan way. Gender role, race, and social class were amongst many of priorities of forming British North America, formally known as the thirteen colonies. With the influence of the civil government, the founders, and the Church, life for the Puritans wasn’t as sweet and pleasant as they hoped for when they journeyed over to this country many centuries ago. Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, played an important role throughout the Puritans. Williams believed that no matter what your religious views are, the freedom to fully enjoy your religion with your own judgments and consciences, you are a good Puritan. The civil government however, did not believe in that statement. Roger Williams published his most famous text, The Bloody Tenant of Persecution. His book defines many principles that defend the liberty of conscience and portrays a great dialogue between truth and peace. The first principle starts you off with a pretty distinct image, “That the blood of so many hundred thousand souls of Protestants and papists, split in the wars of present and former ages, for their respective consciences, is not required or accepted by Jesus Christ the Prince of Peace”. In my own opinion, I believe Williams is not a fan of war. The next few principles he lists are all about the blood of poor souls, the use of weapons, and enforcing uniformity to be the destruction ofmillions. Roger Williams’ next book, To the Right Honorable Both Houses of the High Court of Parliament, mainly focuses on the persecution of conscience and the rights of mankind. “I acknowledge that
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