Ch 26 Electric Fields - Chapter 26 The Electric Field 26.1...

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Chapter 26: The Electric Field
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26.1 Electric Field Models Four basic electric field models: The electric field of a point charge. The electric field of an infinitely long charged wire The electric field of an infinitely wide charged plane. The electric field of a charged sphere. Small charged objects can often be modeled as point charges or charged spheres. Real wires are not infinitely long, but in many practical situations this approximation is perfectly reasonable.
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26.1 Electric Field Models The electric field of a positive and a negative charge . Keep in mind that each arrow represents the field at a point. The electric field is not a spatial quantity that “stretches” from one end of the arrow to the other. ^ 2 4 1 r r q E O πε =
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26.1 Electric Field Models The primary tool for calculating electric fields is the Principle of Superposition of Fields: = + + + = i i net E E E E E .... 3 2 1
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26.2 The Electric Field of Multiple Point Charges PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 26.1 THE ELECTRIC FIELD OF MULTIPLE POINT CHARGES MODEL Model charged objects as point charges. VISUALIZE For the pictorial representation: Establish a coordinate system and show the locations of the charges. Identify the point P at which you want to calculate the electric field. Draw the electric field of each charge at P. Use symmetry to determine if any components of are zero. SOLVE The mathematical representation is For each charge, determine its distance from P and the angle of from the axes. Calculate the field strength of each charge’s electric field. Write each vector in component form. Sum the vector components to determine If needed, determine the magnitude and direction of ASSESS Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and agrees with any known limiting cases.
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