Lecture 8 - Lecture 8 Material Covered in This Lecture: *...

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Event Lecture 8 Material Covered in This Lecture: * Chapter 4, Section 4.3: Random Variables Random Variables A random variable is a function that assigns numerical values to physical outcomes of an experiment. A random variable is typically represented by X X A number Random variable is discrete if its range is a finite or countable set. Random variable is continuous if its range is an interval on number line. Examples: 1 Example 1: Tossing a fair coin 3 times. 2 1. Let X stand for the number of Heads in the 3 tosses. 2. Let Y stand for the number of Tails in the 3 tosses. 3 4 3. Let Z stand for the difference in the number of Heads and the number of Tails in the 3 tosses. 5
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6 Example 2: Counting Cars. At an intersection, an observer counts the number of cars passing by until a new Ford is spotted. Let X be that number. 7 8 Example 3: Waiting for Bus. Suppose you are waiting for a bus at a bus stop at 9:00 am, and the bus can arrive at the bus stop at any time between 9:am and 10:am. Let X be the waiting time.
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2008 for the course STT 421 taught by Professor Nane during the Summer '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Lecture 8 - Lecture 8 Material Covered in This Lecture: *...

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