Menander 3.5 - Menander I Soter"Menander I the...

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Menander I Soter "Menander I the Savior"; referred to in Indian Pali sources as Milinda) was acctually an Indo-Greek King of the Indo-Greek Kingdom (165/[3]/155[3] –130 BC) who built up a substantial domain in Northwestern areas of South Asia and turned into a benefactor of Buddhism. Menander was at first a lord of Bactria. In the wake of overcoming the Punjab[2] he set up a domain in South Asia extending from the Kabul River Escarpment in the west to the Ravi River in the east, and beginning the Swat River Valley in the north to Arachosia (the Helmand Province). Antiquated Indian essayists demonstrate that he propelled undertakings southward into Rajasthan and as farthest east down the Ganges River Escarpment as Pataliputra (Patna), and the Greek geographer Strabo composed that he "vanquished a greater number of tribes than Alexander the Great." Huge quantities of Menander's coins have been uncovered, bearing witness to both the prospering trade and term of his domain. Menander was additionally a supporter of Buddhism, and his discussions with the Buddhist sage Nagasena are recorded in the imperative Buddhist work, the Milinda Panha ("The Questions of King Milinda"; panha signifying "address" in Pali). After his passing in 130 BC, he was prevailing by his better half Agathokleia who controlled as official for his child Strato I. Buddhist custom relates that he gave over his kingdom to his child and resigned from the world. However Plutarch relates that he kicked the bucket in camp while on a military crusade and that his remaining parts were separated similarly between the urban communities to be cherished in landmarks, most likely stupas, over his domain. Author on Zen Buddhism, Peter Haskel, similarly shows this thought of as of now and ever-exhibit edification (the Buddha-nature) inside all creatures. In his book, Bankei Zen, he indicates how the Zen ace, Bank, showed that the Buddha Nature or Buddha Mind is characteristic in each being from delivery, is uncreated, unborn, and is of they are alike 'one substance' of past Buddhas and present creatures, with no distinction - simply like the one water of the unfathomable sea (Peter Haskel, Bankei Zen, Grove Weidenfeld, New York, 1984, page number. 77–78). In the title Tibetan Book of the Dead, it is shown that at death there is an experience with this genuine internal nature, Suga agar BHA or Dharmata, when the cover of egocentricity tend quickly to drop away and sparkling, unhampered Awareness is revealed to us. By Tibetan Nyingma tenet, Tibetan Lama, Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, likens this brilliant substance with the Buddha Nature. He composes:
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