KIBERA,L.W AND KIBERA,F.N - Abstract Sociological...

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Unformatted text preview: Abstract Sociological Foundations of Education is a Masters of Education course in the Department of Educational Foundations, School of Education, University of Nairobi. It is organized into eleven (11) lectures. In this course sociology has been defined as a science of society and social interactions taking place in it, while sociology of education which is a branch of sociology refers to the study of education as an institution. The course has also analyzed the social importance of education to particular societies; its relationships with other social institutions such as the family, government, economy and religion and how these impact on it. Further, the module has dealt with the learner’s social environment in terms of culture, social stratification of the society as well as other variables such as race, ethnicity and gender and how they influence educational outcomes. Finally, it has outlined a number of sociological theories, for example, structural functionalism, conflict, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology approach, feminism and their interpretation of the role of education to society. Kibera, L.W (2013). Sociological Foundations of Education. Nairobi: Center for Open Distance Learning, College of Education and External Studies, University of Nairobi. Abstract The Government of Kenya (GoK) initiated Free Primary Education (FPE) programme‘effective January, 2003. The purpose of FPE was to accelerate the realization of GoK’s commitment to achieving Universal Primary Education (UPE) by 2005 and Education For All (EPA) by 2015. The introduction of FPE increased enrolment by 25% from 5.9 million in 2002 to 7.4 million in 2004. The objectives of the Study were to establish the adequacy of human and physical resources to implement FPE; assess learning outcomes in terms of competency levels; examine the application of knowledge; and measure problem—solving skills. The review of related literature indicated that quality of education is correlated to, but not limited to learner, teacher and schools factors. The pertinent data were obtained from a national stratified random sample of 24,119 pupils in public primary schools in standards 2, 4 and 6, and 985 teachers. A self- administered questionnaire gathered data from the teachers while the learning achievement levels were measured by pup/l performance in tailor-made English, Kiswahili, Mathematics and Science tests. The Study results revealed that school factors explained 22.5% of the variation in test scores, followed by teacher and pupil characteristics with 17.4% and 4.6% receptive/y. The results also revealed that pupils performed better in knowledge items compared to those that measured application and problem—solving abilities although overall, the pupils scored less than 50% of the recommended minimum learning achievement. Kibera L.W and Kibera F.N. (2011). “The Determinants of Learning Achievement of Public Primary Schools in Kenya” in the African International Business and Management Conference (www.aibuma.orgl. 1|Page Abstract In an academic field, research project and/or thesis is an integral and mandatory component of the higher degree programmes. The guidelines on how to write research proposals are therefore expected to assist a student to identify and choose a viable research problem. Many research proposals are turned down each year because of content and methodological deficiencies. The research proposal serves to present the research question or problem to be researched on; discuss its importance to society; the research efforts of others who have worked on related research; suggests sources of data pertinent to solving the research question and how the data will be gathered, analysed and interpreted. A good research proposal is concise and focused although its length is dependent on regulations of different universities; it often ranges between ten and forty double—spaced pages inclusive of appendices. A research proposal has three main chapters or sections namely introduction, literature review and research methodology. Kibera, L.W. and Kibera F.N. (2009). Guidelines for Writing Academic Research Projects in Fountain, Journal of Faculty of Education, November 3, pp 117—129. Abstract The social changes being experienced worldwide cannot be overemphasized. Children are growing up in several and different environments at home, school and community and religious organizations are the settings for social and intellectual experiences from which children acquire and develop the skills, attitudes and attachments which characterize them as individuals and shape their choice and performance of adult roles. This book is about practices and processes involved in socialization and education, particularly the agencies concerned about the ways in which schools, through their teachers, curricula and organization, deliberately and/or informally influence the young. Among all agencies of socialization, schools are in a strong position to exert influence upon the young. This stems in part from their specialized functions and expertise concerning scholastic and technical instruction. Schools introduce to students forms of authority, social and working relationships and occupational roles. Some of this influence is specific and overt, operating through deliberate instruction to more or less determined objectives. Although there is much emphasis on schools and their students, it would make little sense to discuss schools in isolation from the other agencies of socialization. Consequently, we have approached each of our topics through a broad discussion of practices and processes. By doing this we hope that the influence of each socialization agent has been put in its proper perspective and that its limitations can be appreciated. The first chapter on sociology discusses the development of sociology as a discipline and some of its various branches. Chapter 2 deals specifically with the origins and development of sociology of education and its concerns. Sociological theories and their application to education are contained in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 looks at socialization particularly, the agents of socialization and the relationships between socialization and education. To appreciate formal education, indigenous education cannot be overlooked. Chapter 5 and 6 therefore discuss the role and purpose of indigenous education. Chapter 7 examines the relationship between culture and education. Culture basically is seen as the main content of curriculum of any education system while education is always seen as the major agent of development. However, as much as education means well for the society it has ZIPage detriments, for instance creating social classes. Chapter 8 discusses education and social stratification. Chapter 9 looks at the sociology of the classroom and examines its complex environment. Chapter 10 highlights the factors affecting the education of girls while chapter 11 discusses the teacher and teaching profession and the changing multiple roles of the teacher in response to societal changes. Finally, chapter 12 is a case study of the Kenya’s undergraduate students' attitudes and perceptions towards the teaching profession. Kibera, L.W. and Kimokoti A. (2007). Fundamentals of Sociology of Education African Perspective by University of Nairobi Press, Nairobi. Abstract This article examines the concepts of sex and gender and their implications on the socio— economic standing of both men and women in the society. It also analyzes the health status of men and women globally and more specifically in Kenya. The findings show that biological sex is used to allocate roles for men and women yet some of them have no biological bearing. For instance, a woman is allocated all the types of roles associated with taking care of the I domestic chores such as, fetching water, firewood, and bringing up babies. Although man can do these tasks equally well, society does not expect them to perform such assignments. These are traditional roles of women. As result women are overburdened for besides performing these reproductive roles, they have to work to earn a living. The health status of women compared to that of male counterparts is weak and is more vulnerable to sexually transmitted diseases. This is particularly because women sexuality is viewed by society as a man’s possession. Women have little or no control over their sexuality and are also liable to violence such as rape. Educational/y, women are disadvantaged because society prefers to invest more in the education of boys than that of girls. Consequently, girls and women are locked out of well-paying and decision making jobs because they lack the requisite knowledge and skills of such jobs. Kibera, L.W. (2005). ”Sexuality and Reproductive Rights of Women”. Journal of Adult Education. Volume 7, Number 2, pp 24—33.. Abstract The thrust of this paper is to assess the adequacy of teacher education in the preparation 11 of teachers in terms of quality and quantity for Kenya's formal education system that is, pre- primary, primary and up to the secondary cycles of education. To do this, a definition of teacher education is attempted. In addition, various categories of teacher education programmes are assessed with regard to curriculum content, duration of the programmes and academic qualifications of the trainees recruited. Finally, the status of the teaching profession and how it can be improved has been discussed. 3|Page Kibera, L.W. (2005). “Teacher Education and Professionalism: A Kenyan Perspective”. Gender Perspective in Fountain, Journal of Faculty of Education, Number 2, pp 101—112. Abstract There is ample evidence that girls have lower educational and occupational aspirations compared to their male counterparts Dixon (1958) Turner, (1964) Pavalko, 1971; Chivore (1986) and Kibera (1993). The main objective of the research was to establish the relative magnitude of the effects of the factors that are known to militate against the education of girls. The factors investigated comprised, prelevance of pregnancies,‘ drug addiction, lack, of school fees, lack of parental guidance, lack of interest in school work, intimate boy/girl relationship, forced ear/y marriages, cultural beliefs that do not value education girls as that of boys, too much pocket money from parents, discouragement from teachers and fear of being in the same schools with boys. The pertinent results have shown that girls have low educational and occupational aspirations and that the greatest hindrance to their educational advancement is perceived to be pregnancy, followed by peer pressure, lack of school fees, lack of parental guidance, drug addiction and intimate boy/girl relationship. Kibera, L.W. (2002)) “Factors Militating Against Educational Advancement of Secondary School Students in Kenya: A Gender Perspective The Fountain, Journal of Faculty of Education, University of Nairobi Number 1, pp 1—13. I Abstract I v I This article presents the findings and implications of a study carried out to establish the perceptions and attitudes of‘Kenya secondary school students towards the participation of women in decision-making andrpolitics. The findings of the study revealed that the majority of the respondents, both male Ul’lO' female, (70.8%) compared to (29.2%) preferred men’s leadership to women’s. Men received an approval rating of 86% for headship of institutions such as a province, district, country, university, secondary school, political party, company and student leadership from both male and female respondents. Female participants felt that women were suited to heading nursery schools, households, and students. Male respondents, on the other hand, believed that females could head nurseries, and primary schools, and households. Men were perceived as being more courageous, intelligent, rational, tougher and better decision makers than women. Kibera, L.W. (2002). ”Secondary School Students’ Perceptions of Women Participation in Leadership in Kenya”, Journal of Education No. 22, Faculty of Education, University of Dar—es—Salaam, pp 10-12.: \ . ”I 4|Pag’e ...
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