Steam Turbine - Steam Turbine Abstract Steam turbines are...

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Steam Turbine Abstract Steam turbines are devices which convert the energy stored in steam into rotational mechanical energy. These machines are widely used for the generation of electricity in a number of different cycles, such as: 1) Rankine cycle . 2) Reheat cycle. 1
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Ƕ ȈƷǂdz ơǺŧ ǂdz ơƅơǶLjƥ Faculty Of Engineering  Mechanical Engineering Department  Power Station   Project    Steam  Tu rbin es   Student's Name :  A HMAD N ATOUR 1020951 Instructor :    Dr . B I SHARA A . GHANNAM Date :  10/01/2007  2
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3) Regenerative cycle. 4) Combined cycle. Introduction The first steam engine was little more than a toy, the classic Aeolipile made by Heron of Alexandria . Another steam turbine device was created by Italian Giovanni Branca in year 1629. The modern steam turbine was invented in 1884 by Irishman, Charles A. Parsons , whose first model was connected to a dynamo that generated 7.5 kW of electricity. His patent was licensed and the turbine scaled up shortly after by an American, George Westinghouse . A number of other variations of turbines have been developed that work effectively with steam. The de Laval turbine (invented by Gustaf de Laval ) accelerated the steam to full speed before running it against a turbine blade. This was good, because the turbine is simpler, less expensive and does not need to be pressure-proof. It can operate with any pressure of steam. It is also, however, considerably less efficient. The Parson's turbine also turned out to be relatively easy to scale up. Within Parson's lifetime the generating capacity of a unit was scaled up by about 10,000 times. Fig.1 (Parsons Turbine) Stages of Steam Turbine 3
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The steam turbine may consist of several stages. Each stage can be described by analyzing the expansion of steam from a higher pressure to a lower pressure. The steam may be wet, dry saturated or superheated. Fig.2 (Stages of Steam Turbine of Steam Turbine) Consider the steam turbine shown in Fig.2. The output power of the turbine at steady flow condition is: P = m (h 1 -h 2 ) Where m is the mass flow of the steam through the turbine and h 1 and h 2 are specific enthalpy of the steam at inlet respective outlet of the turbine. Fig.3 (T-s diagram for a Rankine cycle) 4
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The efficiency of the steam turbines are often described by the isentropic efficiency for expansion process. The presence of water droplets in the steam will reduce the efficiency of the turbine and cause physical erosion of the blades. Therefore the
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2008 for the course ENGINEERIN pow taught by Professor Mohamad during the Spring '08 term at Aarhus Universitet.

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Steam Turbine - Steam Turbine Abstract Steam turbines are...

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