PS10F07 - T = 300 and 3000 K. Repeat this calculation for...

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Chemistry 391 Fall 2007 Problem Set 10 (LAST ONE) (Due, Monday December 03)
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1. For N 2 at 77.3 K, 1 atm, in a 1-cm 3 container, calculate the one-molecule translational partition function and ratio of this partition function to the number of N 2 molecules present under these conditions. 2. Which species will have the largest rotational partition function: H 2 , HD, or D 2 ? Which of these species will have the largest translational partition function assuming that volume and temperature are identical? When evaluating the rotational partition functions, you can assume that the high-temperature limit is valid. 3. For IF ( ± ν = 610 cm –1 ) calculate the vibrational partition function and populations in the first three vibrational energy levels for
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Unformatted text preview: T = 300 and 3000 K. Repeat this calculation for IBr ( = 269 cm 1 ). Compare the probabilities for IF and IBr. Can you explain the differences between the probabilities of these molecules? For convenience, since it is really the probabilities that matter, you can ignore the zero point energy contribution in the partition functions. 4. a) In the rotational spectrum of H 35 Cl ( I = 2.65 10 47 kg m 2 ), the transition corresponding to the J = 4 to J = 5 transition is the most intense. At what temperature was the spectrum obtained? b) At 1000 K, which rotational transition of H 35 Cl would you expect to demonstrate the greatest intensity?...
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2008 for the course CEM 391 taught by Professor Cuckier during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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PS10F07 - T = 300 and 3000 K. Repeat this calculation for...

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