PHL 202 Argument Paper #2

PHL 202 Argument Paper #2 - "Media Violence is Not the...

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“Media Violence is Not the Problem” Fall 2006 PHL 202 Keith If there were to be something to get my attention, keep me on edge, or get me to actually want to actively defend it… It would be all the press around whether or not
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media violence affects us in such a way that we will go out, commit some crazy crime, and in the end blame what we played or watched for making us do what we did. The media violence of focus here would be video games, which was and currently is still being lashed out at by parents and psychologists. Being a gamer for three-fourths of my life, my position on the matter is no doubt opposing the idea. As far as I am concerned, parents are using video game violence as a scapegoat for their own shortcomings when it comes to parenting their children. Psychologist, I would figure, are just doing their job at helping to find what makes us “tick,” and while their efforts are just, sometimes they can be wrong. The American Psychological Association (APA) gave a press release in April 2000 with its headline being “Violent Video Games Can Increase Aggression” with a subtitle stating “May be more harmful than violent television and movies because of the interactive nature of the games.” They had two studies, one containing 227 college students who completed a measure of trait aggressiveness, following up by reporting their actual aggressive behaviors in their recent past. The second study involved 210 college students that either played a violent game or a nonviolent game, the titles being Wolfenstein 3D and Myst, respectively. In their first study, they found that the college kids who played more video games in junior high and high school engaged in more aggressive behavior. In the second study, a “short time later” reportedly, students playing the violent video game “punished” an opponent for a longer period of time than students who played the latter; the punishment being a noise blast with varying intensity. The APA concluded that “in the short run, playing a violent video game appears to affect
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aggression by priming aggressive thoughts.” They had also said that longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well. In August 2005, the APA gave another press release set on the review of their research regarding violent video games, again stating that they heighten aggression. There were, again, two studies with one participants of unmentioned age and the other with over 600 8 th and 9 th graders. The first study had the participants showing aggressive traits and actions shortly after ten minutes of game play. In the other student containing the 8 th and 9 th graders, the kids who spent more time playing violent video games were deemed more hostile than other kids in the study by their teachers. Apparently, these kids had more verbal interactions with authority figures and were more likely to be implicated with physical ones. It was also noted in the press release that kid playing these violent video games imitated what they did in-game while playing with other kids. Lastly, Craig A. Anderson of the APA goes over myths, facts, and unanswered
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PHL 202 Argument Paper #2 - "Media Violence is Not the...

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