Guide to Economic Data datasources 2-7-2006

Guide to Economic Data datasources 2-7-2006 - LIR 832 DATA...

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Unformatted text preview: LIR 832 DATA SOURCES G UIDE TO E CONOMIC D ATA S OURCES ON THE I NTERNET The hows and wheres of economic data on the web This guide is designed to familiarize students with important sources of data on the internet. This guide covers three topics for the United States: city/region data, industry data, and data on occupations. While far from an exhaustive look at economic data available to the public on the labor market, it is designed to act as a guide to finding – and using – the data made readily available by federal and state governments. OVERVIEW: PRIMARY SOURCES The Bureau of Labor Statistics , or BLS, ( www.bls.gov ) contains an overwhelming amount of data on the labor market, ranging from compensation and unemployment, to workplace safety and job descriptions. The U.S. Census Bureau ( www.census.gov ) contains a wealth of demographic information about any locale, as detailed data is available about even the smallest of cities. In addition to demographics, the Census also presents a vast amount of economic data (listed under the “Business” section on the Census home page). This includes the very powerful (and recommended) “Economic Census” series (more on this later). The Bureau of Economic Analysis , or BEA, ( www.bea.gov ) does not have a lot of information on labor markets, however it is the government’s home for economic data of all kinds, ranging from the GDP of individual areas and industries to information on international trade. The Department of Labor has developed a web service that allows you to explore the job descriptions of different occupation. This service, named ONET (http://online.onetcenter.org/), does not have much in terms of economic data, but the job descriptions used there may help you in this project or down the line… As students at Michigan State University, you have access to top-of-the-line academic research journals and databases through the MSU Libraries. For labor economics, I recommend using EconLit . You can find this by selecting “Indexes” and looking under the “E” at http://er.lib.msu.edu/ . State governments often run their own version of the BLS – often named the state “office of labor market information” (the front page of Michigan’s is below). While some of the data will merely be re-packaged information drawn from the BLS tables, you can often find some very detailed (i.e., local) information on a state’s industries, occupations, or areas. To find your state’s office of LMI, go to: http://www.ows.doleta.gov/map.asp. Other Sites: http://www.fedstats.com http://www.econdata.net/ http://www.whitehouse.gov/fsbr/esbr.html http://www.economy.com/dismal/ http://www.economagic.com/ http://www.cbo.gov/ CITY/REGION ANALYSIS TERMS Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): The general concept of a Metropolitan Statistical Area is that of an area containing a recognized population nucleus and adjacent communities that have a high degree of integration with that nucleus and at least one...
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Guide to Economic Data datasources 2-7-2006 - LIR 832 DATA...

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