Elimination Notes - EliminationNotes .The . .

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 11 pages.

Elimination Notes The cluster of capillaries in each nephron is known as the glomerulus. The  urethra is the structure through which urine travels from the bladder and  passes to the outside of the body. The trigone is the name given to the  fixed base of the urinary bladder. The detrusor is the bladder’s distensible  body.  Laxatives  are often prescribed to promote defecation in patients with  constipation. Codeine and opium tincture may be used to manage chronic  severe diarrhea in patients with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, or  acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Loperamide is also an antidiarrheal  agent. Postvoid residual  can be assessed using a portable noninvasive bladder  ultrasound device, which helps to determine the amount of urine left in the  bladder after voiding. A cystoscopy helps to visualize the structures of the  urinary tract. An x-ray exam of the abdomen may show the condition of  abdominal organs but is not helpful in determining the residual urine left in  the bladder. An intravenous pyelogram may help to determine the function  of the kidneys but does not help in determining postvoid residual. Functional incontinence is a loss of continence with a cause outside the urinary tract, usually related to functional deficits such as altered mobility and  manual dexterity. Parkinson’s disease alters a patient’s mobility, which can result in functional incontinence. Transient incontinence is caused by  medical conditions that in many cases are treatable and reversible.  Parkinson’s disease and its associated problems of mobility are not  reversible. Reflex urinary incontinence is related to spinal cord damage  between C1 and S2; it is not associated with mobility problems caused by  Parkinson’s disease. Overflow urinary incontinence is related to bladder  outlet obstruction or poor bladder emptying because of weak or absent  bladder contractions, not Parkinson’s disease. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to relieve pain. It is a prostaglandin inhibitor. Aspirin interferes with the secretion of  protective mucus and thereby increases the risk of gastric bleeding.  Glycopyrrolate inhibits gastric acid secretion and depresses  gastrointestinal motility; it does not increase the risk of gastric bleeding.  Dicyclomine HCl suppresses peristalsis and decreases gastric emptying; it 
does not increase the risk of gastric bleeding. Iron supplements cause  discoloration of the stool, nausea, constipation, and abdominal cramps as  side effects.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture