Lecture Wk 5, REL132.1 - Lecture Notes REL132FA15 Wk 5(RAAC...

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Lecture Notes REL132FA15, Wk. 5 (RAAC; pages 80-104; TGC: Chapter 4/pages 39 to 50) Overview: Key People (Who, When, & Why) : Abraham (2166 BC); George Guess/Sequoyah (1778-1843); Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882); Ellen White (1827-1915); Antoinette Brown (1825-1921); John Brown (1800-1859) Key Definitions: Protestantism; Pluralism; Romanticism; Transcendentalism; Judeo-Christian heritage; Torah; Circumcision Synthesis, (pulling it together): Students will 1. Consider the dual influences of Evangelical Protestantism & Pluralism in American culture; 2. Examine Judaism, the Torah, and present day relevance; 3. Evaluate lasting significance of “law of general applicability”. 1
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Lecture Notes REL132FA15, Wk. 5 Learning Outcome 1: Consider the dual influences of Evangelical Protestantism & Pluralism in American culture. 1.1 Key People: 1.11 George Guess/ Sequoyah or Gist (1778-1843) “Having noted that white men could convey their thoughts through ‘talking leaves,’ Guess/Sequoyah believed he could devise a similar method for the Cherokee.”* *(http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/S/SE020.html) 1.12 Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) He was the “archetype American romantic of the most progressive or transcendentalist variety” (RAAC, 89). 1.13 Ellen White (1827-1915) As a main prophetess of the Seven-Day Adventist, White “incorporated many of the popular health regimens of the day into church teachings” (RAAC, 91). 1.14 Antoinette Brown (1825-1921) In 1853, New England Congregationalists ordained Brown making her “the first female minister in a fully traditional [denomination]” (RAAC, 96). Even though many fringe evangelical groups allowing women to preach, most mainline and traditional churches kept that role for men only. To our twenty- first century ears, having preaching reserved for men seems chauvinistic. The issue, however, was not one of so much as gender equality but of authority to God as he instructed in the Bible. 2
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Lecture Notes REL132FA15, Wk. 5 Paul, an apostle, gives the Bible verses that outlined the role of women in public worship of a local church to Timothy, his younger apprentice. He wrote, “I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet. For Adam was formed first, then Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and became a transgressor” (1 Timothy 2:12-14 ESV). The grounds for women not “to teach or to exercise authority over a man” in the local church was creational verses cultural. Eve was created after Adam and she felled, sinned, first when she listened to the serpent and ate the forbidden fruit. Whether you agree with this understanding of the verses, it illustrates the tension Protestantism faced from the growing influence of popular culture. It became for some church leadership a fundamental question of, “Do we follow our culture or our God?” 1.15 John Brown (1800-1859) As “a militant Calvinist”, Brown believed he had a call from God to free slaves by force and mounted an unsuccessful insurrection in 1859 resulting in his execution (RAAC, 103).
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