Lecture22 - PHYSICS 231 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I Lecture 22...

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PHYSICS 231 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I Lecture 22
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Simple Pendulum Traveling Waves Longitudinal, Transverse Sinusoidal wave Speed, frequency, wavelength Last Lecture ! = g L " = max cos( t #$ ) y = A cos 2 x m ft # $ % & ( ) * + , - . / 0 v = f
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Speed of a Wave in a Vibrating String T is tension. Pitch = frequency: v = T μ where μ= m L f = v " = 1 T
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Example 13.9 A string is tied tightly between points A and B as a communication device. If one wants to double the wave speed, one could: a) Double the tension b) Quadruple the tension c) Use a string with half the mass d) Use a string with double the mass e) Use a string with quadruple the mass
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Superposition Principle Traveling waves can pass through each other without being altered. y ( x , t ) = y 1 ( x , t ) + y 2 ( x , t )
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Reflection – Fixed End Reflected wave is inverted
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Reflection – Free End Reflected pulse not inverted
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Chapter 14 Sound
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Sound Waves Sound is longitudinal pressure (compression) waves Range of hearing: 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz FREQUENCY DEMO
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Speed of Sound Liquids and Gases: B is bulk modulus, ! is mass/volume Solids: Y is Young’s modulus 331 m/s is v at 0° C; T is the absolute temperature. v = B ! v = Y v air = (331 m s ) T 273 K
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Example 14.1 John Brown hits a steel railroad rail with a hammer. Betsy Brown, standing one mile down the track, hears the bang through the cool 32 ° F air while her twin sister Boopsie is lying next to her and hears the bang through the steel by placing her ear on the track.
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2008 for the course PHY 231 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Lecture22 - PHYSICS 231 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I Lecture 22...

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