Week 3 - Health Psychology II Coping Promoting Health Topic...

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Health Psychology II: Topic 3 Dr. Ros Morrow Psychology 123
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Coping with Stress Definition of Coping Constantly changing cognitive and behavioural [sic]  efforts to manage specific external and/or internal  demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the  The process by which people try to manage the  perceived discrepancy between the demands and  resources they appraise as stressful situations  (Caltabiano & Sarafino, 2002).
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Functions of Coping Richard Lazarus and his colleagues assert that  coping can serve two functions (2002): 1. Emotion Focused Coping 2. Problem Focused Coping
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Emotion-Focused Coping Coping strategies that lead to changes in one’s  perceptions of stressful situations eg: defence mechanisms, rationalism and denial People tend to use ECF when they believe they  can do nothing to change the stressful situation  (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984)
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Problem-Focused Coping Coping strategies in which one views the  stressful situations as problems and uses  problem-solving strategies to decrease or  increase or eliminate the source of stress Problem solving strategies: 1. Identify the problem. 2. Generate possible solutions. 3. Select the appropriate solution. 4. Apply the solution. Results in eliminating the stress
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Problem-Focused & Emotion-Focused Coping Differences Billings and Moos (1981) did research with 200 married  couples The results were: Husbands and wives used more PFC than EFC to deal  with stressful events. Wives reported using more EFC than their husbands. Subjects with higher incomes and education reported  greater use of  PFC than those with less income and  education. Subjects reported much less PFC when stress involved 
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This note was uploaded on 07/29/2008 for the course PSY 123 taught by Professor Various during the Three '04 term at Curtin.

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Week 3 - Health Psychology II Coping Promoting Health Topic...

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