Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++

Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++ - Programming...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++ Michael Barr Publisher: O'Reilly First Edition January 1999 ISBN: 1-56592-354-5, 191 pages This book introduces embedded systems to C and C++ programmers. Topics include testing memory devices, writing and erasing Flash memory, verifying nonvolatile memory contents, controlling on-chip peripherals, device driver design and implementation, optimizing embedded code for size and speed, and making the most of C++ without a performance penalty. Why I Wrote This Book I once heard an estimate that in the United States there are eight microprocessor-based devices for every person. At the time, I wondered how this could be. Are there really that many computers surrounding us? Later, when I had more time to think about it, I started to make a list of the things I used that probably contained a microprocessor. Within five minutes, my list contained ten items: television, stereo, coffee maker, alarm clock, VCR, microwave, dishwasher, remote control, bread machine, and digital watch. And those were just my personal possessions-I quickly came up with ten more devices I used at work. The revelation that every one of those products contains not only a processor, but also software, was not far behind. At last, I knew what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to put my programming skills to work developing embedded computer systems. But how would I acquire the necessary knowledge? At this point, I was in my last year of college. There hadn't been any classes on embedded systems programming so far, and I wasn't able to find any listed in the course catalog. Fortunately, when I graduated I found a company that let me write embedded software while I was still learning. But I was pretty much on my own. The few people who knew about embedded software were usually too busy to explain things to me, so I searched high and low for a book that would teach me. In the end, I found I had to learn everything myself. I never found that book, and I always wondered why no one had written it. Now I've decided to write that book myself. And in the process, I've discovered why no one had done it before. One of the hardest things about this subject is knowing when to stop writing. Each embedded system is unique, and I have learned that there is an exception to every rule. Nevertheless, I have tried to boil the subject down to its essence and present only those things that programmers definitely need to know about embedded systems. Intended Audience This is a book about programming embedded systems in C and C++. As such, it assumes that the reader already has some programming experience and is at least familiar with the syntax of these two languages. It also helps if you have some familiarity with basic data structures, such as linked lists. The book does not assume that you have a great deal of knowledge about computer hardware, but it does expect that you are willing to learn a little bit about hardware along the way. This is, after all, a part of the job of an embedded programmer.hardware along the way....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 07/30/2008 for the course COMP 403 taught by Professor Jaques during the Spring '08 term at Coe College.

Page1 / 122

Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++ - Programming...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online