lec5spr08 - Ch. 2 again Summary of bonds and interactions...

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Ch. 2 again Summary of bonds and interactions 1. Covalent bonds - A. polar - B. nonpolar 2. Non-covalent bonds - A. Ionic (full charges) - B. Hydrogen bonds (partial charges) - C. Van der Waals interactions-- distance dependent. They are very weak individually but many together are strong (like a zipper). 3. Hydrophobic aggregations- exclusions from water. Not specific bonds or even forces between molecules — make membranes fluid. Discussed already
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WATER- “FEARING”
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Aggregation due to exclusion.
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Amphipathic means “two natures”. One end of ampiphathic molecules is polar (hydrophilic) and the other end is nonpolar (hydrophobic). Examples: Detergents anionic cationic neutral - + Hydrophillic head Hydrophobic tail Membrane Phospholipids - or 0
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A detergent micelle These are anionic detergents in water. Their hydrophillic heads face the water. Their hydrophobic tails face away from the water. In the middle of this micelle is a piece of greasy dirt (hydrophobic). They are amphipathic.
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02_15_organic molecules.jpg In the case of all but the fatty acids (which cluster via hydrophobic interactions), the building blocks are converted to the larger units through covalent polymerization by dehydration (condensation reactions involving loss of water). The Nature of Biological Molecules
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02_27_monomeric subunits.jpg Covalent bonds formed by condensation reactions hold together the monomers of macromolecules. But non-covalent interactions (Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, and hydrophobic interactions) are important in interaction of the macromolecule with other molecules and with different parts of itself.
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Amino acids A. 20 different ones in cells. Side group (next slide) determines whether which amino acid it is B. Come together by polymerization to form proteins.
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Proteins are held together by special covalent bonds called peptide bonds
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Compared to a protein, “polypeptide” refers to a shorter, not necessarily short stretch of amino acids.
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This note was uploaded on 07/30/2008 for the course BIO 201 taught by Professor Janicke during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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lec5spr08 - Ch. 2 again Summary of bonds and interactions...

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