ADJ 306 Notes 1

ADJ 306 Notes 1 - ADJ 306 Notes 1/29/08 Why study ethics?...

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ADJ 306 Notes 1/29/08 Why study ethics? many justice topics have ethical implications an act may be legal, but it is not necessarily ethical laws are often justified using an ethical rationale some laws are concerned with public safety others are based solely on moral or ethical grounds Doing whats Right Legal Moral = Ethical Judges: can reject or accept plea bargains make decisions about rules of evidence make decisions about sentencing Probation Officers can recommend prison sentences for the convicted Prison Officials can grant "good time" to offenders can place an inmate in segregation Parole Officials decide when to file violation reports
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ALL OF THESE DECISIONS INVOLVE SOME DEGREE OF DISCRETION! 2/5/08 *Find Article with some compelling moral/ethical dilemma (in law enforcement) *take 2 minutes to discuss article, what is the moral/ethical dilemma? Ethical Systems (I) A set of underlying premises that : form the basis for moral judgements are the source of moral beliefs are beyond arguments are internally consistent possess a type of "moral common sense" Ethical Systems (II) Are described by Baelz as: prescriptive authoritative logically impartial or universal not self-serving Teleological Ethical Systems RESULTS MATTER an act is "good" or "bad" depending on the results it brings about the consequences of the act are what is judged "the ends, justifies the means" Ethical Formalism/Absolutism (I) According to German philosopher Immanuel Kant: Good Will (motivation) is the only thing that is intrisically good Duty is required behavior. It is self-imposed and necessary to morality
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Ethical Formalism/Absolutism (II) two kinds of imperatives (commands) drive human behavior Hypothetical imperatives: drive us to achieve certain ends, are consequential in nature, are neither "moral" nor "immoral" Categorical imperatives: are absolute, are based on good will, determine morality Utilitarianism (I) (A teleological system--the consequences are judged) an action's morality depends on how much it contributes to the overall good of society humans are hedonistic they seek to maximize pleasure and avoid pain an ethical system should be consistent with this Utilitarianism (II) if an act benefits many people and causes pain to a few, it is still good because
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2008 for the course ADJ 306 taught by Professor Bamford during the Spring '08 term at George Mason.

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ADJ 306 Notes 1 - ADJ 306 Notes 1/29/08 Why study ethics?...

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