Research Paper - Vella 1 Jenna Vella Jason Holloway HIST 1112 13 November 2014 The Chinese Opium Wars Up until 1839 China was a tremendous importer of

Research Paper - Vella 1 Jenna Vella Jason Holloway HIST...

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Vella Jenna Vella Jason Holloway HIST 1112 13 November 2014 The Chinese Opium Wars Up until 1839, China was a tremendous importer of opium. Opium was coming from Great Britain and Great Britain was making huge profits off of the opium trade. Opium is now an illegal narcotic that is made from the poppy flower. Before 1839, opium was used regularly in China as a social drug. In 1839, everything changed. The Daoguang emperor rejected the proposal to allow legalized and taxed regulation of opium and therefore the opium trade was abolished. A war, the First Opium War, broke out between Britain and China, and eventually the First Unequal Treaty was signed. It was this treaty that led to the Second Opium War, because Great Britain was not satisfied with it. Lasting effects of the Chinese Opium Wars are still seen today. Opium is a narcotic drug that is produced from the drying resin of unripe seed capsules of the poppy flower. The painkilling properties found in the molecules of opiates are similar to endorphins, which are produced naturally by the body. For users, a euphoric and pleasurable high is obtained at first, but with continuous use, the body demands larger amounts of the drug for it to be as effective to the user. Addicts experience a 1
Vella painful withdrawal from the use of opium, and many times would rather keep abusing the drug to avoid the uncomfortable pain. The first real addiction problems arose when smoking opium was introduced to China toward the middle of the 17 th century. Before that, opium was typically being taken as a solid or with a beverage, as long ago as 100 AD (“Opium”). It was this prevalent addiction of opium use in China that led to the abolishment of opium trade into China. During the 17 th and 18 th centuries, China was a mostly self- sufficient country. There weren’t many items on the European market that China was interested in. However, the demand for Chinese products such as porcelain, silk, and especially tea were so high in Europe that it created a trade imbalance. There was a heavy flow of European silver pouring into China during this time. Now, the British East India

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