The_Elizabethans_And_America - Published in American...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 14 pages.

The preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 14 pages.
Published inAmerican Heritage Magazine()The Elizabethans And AmericaByA. L. RowseApril 1959 | Volume 10, Issue 3“To push back the consciousness of American beginnings, beyond Jamestown,beyond the Pilgrims, to the highwater mark of the Elizabethan AgeNote: The author was an Englishman.Therefore, when he uses the pronoun “we”, he is referring tothe English.The discovery of the New World, it has been said, is much the greatest event in the history of the Old.Certainly as that discovery went further and gathered momentum it marked a vast difference, after all,between the modern world and the Middle Ages—which, in contemplation, have a certain static,enclosed quality in contrast with the ceaseless dynamism, the expansiveness characteristic of our world.In this connotation—it is the heart of the subject—the discovery of America ultimately made the fortuneof Great Britain and transformed its situation in the world. In Trevelyan’s words, here was a very taut,efficient little society within an island lying athwart the main seaways from America to northwesternEurope, a situation from which the country profited more and more. As America prospered and becamemore important, so did England.We live in the midst of another profound transformation. In the dangers of our time, the separateness ofEnglish history may be thought of as merging in the general history of the English-speaking peoples, whoare drawn closer together by them. But already twice in our lifetime Great Britain’s existence has beenassured by its preponderant partner, the United States.We owe this factor of our safety, the very condition of our lives, to the ambition and foresight, theenterprise and persistence, of our common ancestors, the Elizabethans. Their struggle to establish anEnglish foothold on the other side of the Atlantic, their part in extending our language and institutionsacross the seas, the essential first steps that have led to an English world community—history can hardlyoffer a more significant theme.But our ancestors arrived on the scene rather belatedly: the Portuguese, the Spaniards, the French, wereall there before us. It is a striking thought that more than a century elapsed between the time when theSpaniards made their first permanent settlement in America in 1493 and the English made theirs atJamestown in 1607. The Elizabethan effort, which did not really get going until the second half of theQueen’s reign, is all the more impressive: it shows what can be done by a small people, in the rightcircumstances, with a will.They had, under the early Tudors, with the backing mainly of the Bristol merchants and the inspiration ofthe Cabots, John and his son Sebastian, made various sporadic, inadequate, baffled efforts into andacross the Atlantic. We may well think that Henry VIII would have done better to put some of the energythat went into matrimonial, into geographic, enterprises. However, he did create an English navy, theprime condition of later maritime achievement, and he did procreate Elizabeth; he could not have donemuch better.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 14 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
scarborough
Tags
US History, Sir Francis Drake, Jamestown, Elizabeth I of England, The Queen, Francis Drake

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture