Module 4a - Module 4a The Jacksonian Era Module 4a(The Jacksonian Era 1828-1848 Overview Administrations of Andrew Jackson and Martin VanBuren Westward

Module 4a - Module 4a The Jacksonian Era Module 4a(The...

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Module 4a The Jacksonian Era Module 4a (The Jacksonian Era) 1828-1848 Overview Administrations of Andrew Jackson and Martin VanBuren Westward Expansion Texas Revolution Mexican-American War Transcendentalism Election of 1828 The election of 1828 was unique in that nominations were no longer made by Congressional caucuses, but by conventions and state legislatures. John Quincy Adams was re-nominated by the National Republicans, and the Democratic Republican (soon to be simply Democratic) opposition was led by Andrew Jackson and his vice-presidential candidate, John C. Calhoun (who had previously been vice president under Adams). The campaign was one of mud-slinging. Adams was accused of misusing public funds — he had supposedly purchased gambling devices for the presidential residence; actually he had simply bought a chessboard and a pool table. He was also accused of providing women to Russian officials when he was the American minister to Russia. The charges against Jackson were much more malicious. He was accused of murder for executing militia deserters and dueling. In addition, he and his wife were accused of adultery. Rachel was a divorcee'; she and Jackson believed her divorce was finalized before their marriage. The papers were incomplete, however, and she was publicly branded an adulteress by Jackson's political opponents. Mrs. Jackson was humiliated, became ill and died before the inauguration. Jackson believed these attacks caused his wife's death. The election results were a clear victory for Jackson, but were highly sectional in nature. The South, West, and the states of Pennsylvania and New York went for Jackson; New England voted for Adams. After the election, Adams was later elected to the House of Representatives, where he served 18 years. He died in the House chamber while
working at his desk. He is the only former president to serve in the House of Representatives after leaving office as President. Andrew Jackson - The Man Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States, was born near the border between North and South Carolina on March 15, 1767. Jackson's father died as the result of a logging accident just a few weeks before the future president was born. Jackson's mother, Elizabeth, was a strong, independent woman. After her husband's death she raised her three sons at the South Carolina home of one of her sisters. Young Andrew was nine years old when the Declaration of Independence was signed and at thirteen he joined the Continental Army as a courier. The Revolution took a toll on the Jackson family. All three boys saw active service. One of Andrew's older brothers, Hugh, died after the Battle of Stono Ferry, South Carolina in 1779, and two years later Andrew and his other brother Robert were taken prisoner for a few weeks in April 1781. While they were captives, a British officer ordered them to clean his boots. The boys refused, the officer struck them with his sword and Andrew's hand was cut to the bone. Because of his ill treatment, Jackson harbored a bitter resentment towards the British until his death.

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