session4 - Test Yourself (on your 4x6 card) Argument 1 a....

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Unformatted text preview: Test Yourself (on your 4x6 card) Argument 1 a. Valid but not sound b. Sound but not valid c. Neither valid nor sound d. Both valid and sound 1. No freshmen are motivated. 2. All students who get As are motivated. 1. Therefore no freshmen will get As. Test Yourself (on your 4x6 card) Argument 2 a. Valid but not sound b. Sound but not valid c. Neither valid nor sound d. Both valid and sound 1. All Greeks are mortal. 2. Socrates is a Greek. 1. Therefore Socrates is mortal. Test Yourself (on your 4x6 card) Argument 3 a. Valid but not sound b. Sound but not valid c. Neither valid nor sound d. Both valid and sound 1. All students are poor. 2. No students are lazy. 1. Therefore no poor people are lazy. Beginning with the Poets Homer (left): blind poet from Ionia. Author of Iliad and Odyssey. The most revered of all Greek poets. Hesiod (right): agrarian poet from Euboea. Author of Works and Days, and Theogony. c. 725 BCE c. 650 BCE Homers Picture of the World Three realms: 1. Sky (heaven) 2. Earth and Ocean (surrounding Earth) 3. Tartarus (underworld) Each of these realms is controlled by a ruling deity Zeus is the ruler of the Sky. He expresses his will by means of the thunderbolt. Poseidon (Homer calls him the Earth- shaker) rules land and sea. By shaking the earth he causes storms at sea. Hades is the god of the underworld. He rules the souls of the dead in Tartarus. Hesiod on the origin of the Gods: In truth at first Chaos came to be , but next wide- bosomed Earth , the ever-sure foundation of all the deathless ones who hold the peaks of snowy Olympus, and dim Tartarus in the depth of the wide-pathed Earth, and Eros (Love ), fairest among the deathless gods, who unnerves the limbs and overcomes the mind and wise counsels of all gods and all men within them. From Chaos came forth Erebus and black Night ; but of Night were born Aether and Day , whom she conceived and bore from union in love with Erebus. And Earth first bore starry Heaven , equal to herself, to cover her on every side, and to be an ever-sure abiding-place for the blessed gods. From the Theogony Both Homer and Hesiod express an interest in these two questions: 1. What is the 1....
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session4 - Test Yourself (on your 4x6 card) Argument 1 a....

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