Rashomon response

Rashomon response - Rashomon / In a Grove Significance The...

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Rashomon / In a Grove Significance The story of Rashomon by Ryunosuke Akutagawa is very socially and culturally significant in both 1950’s society and even today. Many themes and symbols in the short story are to be understood and seen in everyday life. The giant gate in the story is seen in similar forms around the world, usually representing the entrance into a major city or town. Once in a city, many times the culture is significantly different than that of the surrounding areas. In the story, the servant enters through the gate, where he soon experiences and sees things he never had before. He encounters the dead women who used to sell fake fish meat for money, and the lady stealing hair from copses to make wigs. These events symbolize how in a culture like that, perhaps “city life” may require unethical actions to survive. In the real world, many socially acceptable things within a culture like this would never be tolerated in more suburban towns where crime and chaos are much less. Here it
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This note was uploaded on 03/11/2008 for the course ENG 117G taught by Professor Bowlin during the Spring '08 term at Binghamton.

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Rashomon response - Rashomon / In a Grove Significance The...

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