LewisandClark - Document A Jeffersons Letter to Meriwether Lewis(Modified The passage below is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Meriwether

LewisandClark - Document A Jeffersons Letter to Meriwether...

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Document A: Jefferson’s Letter to Meriwether Lewis (Modified) The passage below is from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to Meriwether Lewis on June 20, 1803. Considering the interest which every nation has in extending and strengthening the authority of reason and justice among the people around them, it will be useful to acquire what knowledge you can of the state of morality, religion, and information among them; as it may better enable those who may endeavor to civilize and instruct them. . . .In all your interactions with the natives, treat them in the most friendly and conciliatory manner. . . . Assure them that the purpose of your journey is innocent. Make them acquainted with . . . our wish to be neighborly, friendly, and useful to them, and to trade with them.Find out what articles would be most desirable for both of us to trade. If a few of their influential chiefs. . .wish to visit us, arrange such a visit for them. . . . If any of them wish to have some of their young people raised by us and taught things that may be useful to them, we will receive, instruct and take care of them.Such a mission, whether of influential chiefs or of young people, would give some security to your own party. Carry with you some smallpox medicine. . .and instruct and encourage them to use it. This may be done wherever you spendthewinter. Source: Thomas Jefferson to Meriwether Lewis, June 20, 1803.
Document B: Diary Entry of Meriwether Lewis (Modified) This morning at daylight the Indians got up and crowded around the fire. J. Fields, who was on post, had carelessly laid his gun down behind him.. . . One of the Indians, the fellow to whom I had given the medal last evening, slipped behind J. Fields and took his gun and his brother’s gun. At the same instant two other Indians advanced and seized the guns of Drewyer and myself. J. Fields seeing this turned about to look for his gun and saw the fellow just running off wit it and his brother’s. He called to his brother,who instantly jumped up and pursued the Indian with him. They overtook him. . . . R. Fields, as he seized his gun, stabbed the Indian to the heart with his knife. The fellow ran about 15 steps and fell dead.Drewyer,who was awake,saw the Indian take hold of his gun and instantly jumped up and seized it.. . . His jumping upand crying “Damn you,let go of my gun” awakened me.. . . I saw Drewyer in a scuffle with the Indian for his gun.. . . Drewyer asked me if he might not kill the fellow, which I also forbid as the Indian did not appear to wish to kill us. As soon as they found us all in possession of our arms,the Indians

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