ENGL 3260 - Miscegenation & Colorism in the Narrative of Frederick Douglass and its Modern Day Impli

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Kandace Huddleston ENGL 3260 – Black American Literature Watson Due: 7 November 2016 Miscegenation & Colorism in the Narrative of Frederick Douglass and its Modern Day Implications Miscegenation and colorism is deeply rooted in the purposely undocumented history of  African Americans. Among historical documents that offer us a greater understanding of  miscegenation and colorism is the Narrative of Frederick Douglass. In this slave narrative  Douglass tells us about his life from about the age of seven up until he gained his freedom in  September of 1838. Douglass tells the tale of some of the most brutal practices of slavery and its  effects. In order to truly understand these ideologies, we must closely examine the history of  Africans from the day we were taken from our homeland, to the day we landed on what we now  call the United States of America. From there we can understand how miscegenation shaped a  brand new ideology known as colorism, that became most popular during the 20 th  century and  still proves to be relevant in modern day America when it comes to self-hatred and opportunities  amongst blacks. Europeans were the first to initiate black-white sexual encounters at the beginning of the  slave trade in the 16 th  century. In order to be more easily accessible to white sailors, black  women and children were allowed more mobility on slave ships than their male counterparts.  Since slaves were equal to property just as animals and objects, they were allowed no rights to  their own bodies. Because of this, the law did not recognize marriage or parenthood of African  slaves, thus no record of sexual abuse in courts, government, or the press [Sus16]. In an excerpt  from the Encyclopedia of the Middle Passage, it is suggested that the pattern of rape that these 
Kandace Huddleston ENGL 3260 – Black American Literature Watson Due: 7 November 2016 women and children were subjected to had little to do with sexual urges and was rather an  assertion of dominance over the Africans. A passage from the book reads,  “But, when viewed from the perspective that the crew and slave merchants have  been away from their homes where they could have easily been filled with pent up desires for many months, it then becomes apparent that sexual abuse and rape  during the Atlantic voyage served both the purpose of letting off the steam as well as gratifying the desire to dominate the Africans.” [Toy07] The pattern of sexual exploitation began during the middle passage and continued on into the  New World. 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture