171pmk - Pm ctU/c M#21” W Page2 NAME{1&4[lawn I l(10...

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Unformatted text preview: Pm ctU/c M #21” W\ Page2 NAME {1&4 [lawn I?! l. (10 points) Circle the species with the indicated property. a. A point group that could contain a polar molecule: 1h C3v D4h Td b. Most exothermic process: Cu” a Cu+2 Cu —-> Cu+2 ® 0 —> O'2 c. Paramagnetic species: Zn+2 Ti+4 NO+ d. Highest melting point: CF4 4 CBI‘4 C14 e. Atom or ion with incorrect electronic configuration: Ni"'[Ar]4s13d8 Eu[Xe]6sz4f7 Yb+3[Xe]4f13 Ag[Kr]5s14d10 Page3 NAIWE :1 __ 2. (12 points) Using VSEPR theory, (i) draw the best structure, including resonance if any, for the 7 following molecules and indicate any formal charges other than zero; (ii) give bond angles; (iii) determine the point group. a. RDF4 4pm: « " £65 .. o ” ‘ “PM (11) (19"5 I l \E\ (iii) 94y, V 'E‘ .. ’ b. (C1BrI)' I .39' {fin Gm:}-g;" (i) BV-I-le' .Q‘le. ’goo (ii) 130° Cl ’1 - I Q- 1‘fo I I e 2L9: Iain (iii) CoDV (09' a 5pr-' £1319 ‘ c. (SeClBrOT2 _ (i) SQ'WQ (5“ qua 0-5949“ .. LL _ (11) Br‘ge _ l e (iii) CS 0-39— 66" ' I @_ 29’ (8!! 3791—7519“ J”)? d. N02‘ 6) N'EQ ' o O‘ N‘OB’ 11 Z .. ()Ll 0 @_ ‘ Q (110sz (pg-.9 3P“; £r19.}>lqnar- ’6 K’\ /O/ \O/ \ \ v. a Page4 NAME Ke >1 3. (16 points) a. Draw a molecular orbital diagram for B2. Be sure to label all atomic and molecular orbitals with g or u, if appropriate, and indicate the electron distribution. Use dotted lines to show which atomic orbitals are used to form which molecular orbitals. b. Based on your M.O. diagram in part a: i. Calculate the bond order for B2. BO: hut-1):) ii. If B2 is reduced to B2' how will this affect its bond length? 3.0. increasesto [-3, bond ten9+h decreayeg. iii. What is the HOMO in Bz? What is the LUMO? m4 TTM iv. What is the spin multiplicity of B2? 2g“ :1(})+l:3 triple‘i 51Lde- 0. How and why does the MO. diagram for B2 differ from that of Oz? 69(ZP) above TTu m 8;, 6g (2p) below TN :0 OZ became 05 one 9095 leH 1‘?) right across a row 2" (efFeChx/e nuclear charge) Increafef- 25 and 2p [Pl/ng become Fufiheraway m energ Ales ormeou mixing 1 less Siablllja‘hon 0? 590:) ( (€55 detmbt‘lfjafwn 0f 69 (2p)- Page 5 NANIE Z _ 4. (12 points) a. For each of the following atomic orbital diagrams determine (i) the number of angular nodes; (ii) the type of orbital; (iii) the point group: - “fit-h.“ :-:-‘.\ I t' L) a angular” noaer d tzorbH-al LU) D00 h b. For each of the following electron density maps determine the molecular orbital that is pictured and which atomic orbitals they came from (e. g. o from 25 + 25). Does g, u, or no symbol apply? 69 tram Px+ FY 36) +699 ©®® Page 6 NAlVIE 5. (25 points) SHORT ANSWERS 21. Give two cations that possess the [Xe]4f7 electronic configuration. @1174 Gd“; Tb+4~ b. Which first row transition metal has a common oxidation state of +1? Cu c. What is the highest order improper rotation axis in: i.CH4 3‘} ii. SF6 g (I FC(C5H5)2 0 d. Draw the structure of C3F4 (Hint: this is NOT a cage compound). Explain briefly Why the four fluorines are not coplanar. Determine the point group. 2: F f d fixl; %k: CB:CC\F r Dz. \\ F t t i1 orig?" W EP/VE‘EP hilt: "JV'V Cl’r’cp WbOWHWQS P2 Orbltonron respechvg Corbonf $0 the Py orbrtal on C: is no+avaugb1e forhy’ofldlba‘h'dfl avthdjom/ Ffifld/lmcljl édM/QCK [Dy flay OV‘ CKFCC ‘ Page 7 ' NAME I \Z #5 Cont’d. e. How many binary ionic materials can be made from Sr, Cs, Se and Te? Put them in order of expected melting points from highest to lowest. 9897 Sr Te7 C§ZSe7 C5 1T8 d. The following two molecular orbitals in carbon monoxide (CO) come from a linear combination of which atomic orbitals? Which molecular orbital is more like carbon and which is more like oxygen? Please briefly explain your reasoning. More like Oxygen More Jude Carbon. generally: more @l/echonegaflVQ elemenfl haw closer QflQr’ngs 1D bonding orbitalf, Page 8 6. (25 points) a. Use X’s to fill in all (Td) sites. If the the circles represent anions, what structure is formed? 86 . QnH Fluorth (N070) What is the coordination number, with respect to cations, of the anions? % What is the coordination number, with respect to anions, of the cations? 4 How many formula units are in this unit cell? 4 b. Use X’s to fill in half of the tetrahedral (Td) sites. If the circles represent Se anions, and the X’s Cd ions, how many formula units are in this unit cell? 4 If the density of CdSe is 5.8 g/cm3, calculate the Cd—Se bond distance, Please show all your calculations. 599 owl/teamed . c. Use X’s to fill all octahedral (Oh) C) sites. If the circles representmbi-di'um ions and the X’s potassium ions, what is the structure formed? pm (Nam or roolétaH’) What is the expected range of radius ratio values? 04%| ~O-7r57— If the shortest cation-anion distance is 3.0 A calculate the density of this structure. Please show all your calculations. see a—H-ach ed : .8 cm3 D221 VZ/Vl K? b7 D 5 9( V p y M: 4(‘q‘9/(pULXLO'L39/moa):I'ZTX10’2‘3 D: 5 gfi/Cma —- [ 5 89/Io’7-m ET 3 : 582(10'2 ( IO’Wn 9:3 \ZTXlO'ng _ (a 03;; 5 EXIO’Z’qj/Ps3 ’ Cdge bond: gran : Z-(OP‘ C l : .01 3 > V M : 41(‘1L4-4S‘ : 4,qg-xz0’”5 Lp.ozxt01°>9/moJ V: 3.0fl°x2,:(pf§ :0]. 4o v:((flx(ci M.‘CM (O’lm ~72. M‘ Z-lLfl X Wilma D: 7.29 9/cm3 , 3 \3: 2 .\LOX(O “CF” ...
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